Prediction of noise from small to medium sized crowds

Hayne, M. J., Taylor, J. C., Rumble, R. H. and Mee, D. J. (2011). Prediction of noise from small to medium sized crowds. In: David J. Mee and Ian Hillock, Acoustics 2011: Breaking New Ground: Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the Australian Acoustical Society. Acoustics 2011: Breaking New Ground, Gold Coast, Australia, (1-7). 2-4 November 2011.

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Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
Author Hayne, M. J.
Taylor, J. C.
Rumble, R. H.
Mee, D. J.
Title of paper Prediction of noise from small to medium sized crowds
Conference name Acoustics 2011: Breaking New Ground
Conference location Gold Coast, Australia
Conference dates 2-4 November 2011
Proceedings title Acoustics 2011: Breaking New Ground: Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the Australian Acoustical Society
Place of Publication Darlinghurst, Australia
Publisher The Australian Acoustical Society
Publication Year 2011
Sub-type Fully published paper
ISBN 9780975785584
Editor David J. Mee
Ian Hillock
Start page 1
End page 7
Total pages 7
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Abstract/Summary The prediction of crowd noise is a problem faced by acoustical consultants. Although consultants are frequently required to predict noise emissions from activities involving crowds of people, there are no reliable prediction methodologies available. In the past, reliance has been made upon the adoption of results measured at similar venues or by extrapolating the vocal effort from an individual to derive the overall level for a defined crowd size. Applying these methodologies can result in prediction errors are largs as 15dB(A), indicating that they do not correctly characterise this type of noise. To derive an appropriate prediction methodology, the authors have investigated the factors that influence the generation of crowd noise such as Lombard effect, crowd size, orientation of individuals within the crowd and whether individuals act together as a synchronised source or behave randomly. Using these factors as a basis, a series of controlled and uncontrolled experiments have been conducted in order to derieve a set of equations that are suitable for use by consultants to predict the noise emissions from small to medium sized crowds (up to 100 people) located in outdoor spaces.
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Paper number 133

 
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Created: Wed, 25 Jan 2012, 10:12:12 EST by Rose Clements on behalf of School of Mechanical and Mining Engineering