The potential impact of smoke-free facilities on smoking cessation in people with mental illness

Lawrence, David, Lawn, Sharon, Kisely, Stephen, Bates, Ann, Mitrou, Francis and Zubrick, Stephen R. (2011) The potential impact of smoke-free facilities on smoking cessation in people with mental illness. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, 45 12: 1053-1060. doi:10.3109/00048674.2011.619961


Author Lawrence, David
Lawn, Sharon
Kisely, Stephen
Bates, Ann
Mitrou, Francis
Zubrick, Stephen R.
Title The potential impact of smoke-free facilities on smoking cessation in people with mental illness
Journal name Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0004-8674
1440-1614
Publication date 2011-12-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.3109/00048674.2011.619961
Volume 45
Issue 12
Start page 1053
End page 1060
Total pages 8
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Sage Publications
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objective: The aim of this paper was to estimate the degree to which smoke-free facilities may facilitate smoking cessation in smokers with mental illness by estimating the proportion of smokers with mental illness who receive inpatient treatment, their smoking rates and average durations of stay. 

Method: Smoking and hospitalization rates were estimated from the Australian National Survey of Mental Health and Wellbeing. Information on duration of inpatient treatment was calculated from the Western Australian Mental Health Information System.

Results: Of Australia ’ s estimated 3 567 000 current adult smokers, 32.4% had a mental illness in the past 12 months, and 66.6% had a lifetime mental illness. However, only 1.4% of smokers were hospitalized for a mental health problem in the past 12 months, and 6.3% had ever been hospitalized for a mental health problem. Of those hospitalized for mental health treatment in the past 12 months, 61.2% were current smokers. In 2007 median duration of inpatient mental health admissions was 1 day, and 57% of admissions had duration of 2 days or less.

Conclusions: The majority of smokers with mental illness are not treated in inpatient facilities, and where inpatient admissions occur they are generally of short duration. While smoking cessation is an important goal in treatment of smokers with mental illness, support after discharge from inpatient care is important for longer term cessation. Other strategies will be required to support smoking cessation efforts for the majority of smokers with mental illness not in contact with mental health services. 
Keyword Mental health services
Severe mental illness
Smoke-free facilities
Smoking cessation
Tobacco control
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2012 Collection
School of Public Health Publications
 
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