Wild dogma II: The role and implications of wild dogma for wild dog management in Australia

Allen, Benjamin L., Engeman, Richard M. and Allen, Lee R. (2011) Wild dogma II: The role and implications of wild dogma for wild dog management in Australia. Current Zoology, 57 6: 737-740.

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Author Allen, Benjamin L.
Engeman, Richard M.
Allen, Lee R.
Title Wild dogma II: The role and implications of wild dogma for wild dog management in Australia
Journal name Current Zoology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1674-5507
Publication date 2011-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
Open Access Status File (Publisher version)
Volume 57
Issue 6
Start page 737
End page 740
Total pages 4
Place of publication Beijing, China
Publisher Current Zoology Editorial Office
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Abstract The studies of Allen (2011) and Allen et al. (2011) recently examined the methodology underpinning claims that dingoes provide net benefits to biodiversity by suppressing foxes and cats. They found most studies to have design flaws and/or observational methods that preclude valid interpretations from the data, describing most of the current literature as ‘wild dogma’. In this short supplement, we briefly highlight the roles and implications of wild dogma for wild dog management in Australia. We discuss nomenclature, and the influence that unreliable science can have on policy and practice changes related to apex predator management.
Keyword Apex predator
Canis lupus dingo
Practice change
Public perceptions
Wild dog management
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2012 Collection
School of Agriculture and Food Sciences
 
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