Review of feral cat eradications on islands

Campell, K. J., Harper, G., Algar, D., Hanson, C. C., Keitt, B. S. and Robinson, S. (2011). Review of feral cat eradications on islands. In: C. R. Veitch, M. N. Clout and D. R. Towns, Island Invasives: Eradication and Management: Proceedings of the International Conference on Island Invasives. International Conference on Island Invasives: Eradication and Management, Auckland, New Zealand, (37-46). 8 - 12 February 2010.

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Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
Author Campell, K. J.
Harper, G.
Algar, D.
Hanson, C. C.
Keitt, B. S.
Robinson, S.
Title of paper Review of feral cat eradications on islands
Conference name International Conference on Island Invasives: Eradication and Management
Conference location Auckland, New Zealand
Conference dates 8 - 12 February 2010
Proceedings title Island Invasives: Eradication and Management: Proceedings of the International Conference on Island Invasives
Place of Publication Gland, Switzerland
Publisher IUCN
Publication Year 2011
Sub-type Fully published paper
ISBN 9782831712918
Editor C. R. Veitch
M. N. Clout
D. R. Towns
Start page 37
End page 46
Total pages 10
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Abstract/Summary Feral cats are a substantial threat to native and endemic fauna on islands and are being eradicated with increasing frequency. Worldwide, 87 campaigns have been completed on 83 islands, for a total area of 114,173 ha. Nineteen unsuccessful eradication attempts are known on 15 islands and lessons learnt from those failures are provided. At least fi ve campaigns are currently underway. We review past cat eradication campaigns, and the methods used to eradicate and detect cats in those campaigns. We also review recent advances in eradication and detection methods. We outline proposed eradications and document a trend for increasingly larger islands being considered, but note that although post-eradication conservation impacts are generally positive, there have been some negative ecosystem impacts.
Keyword Felis catus
Detection methods
Island restoration
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Wed, 18 Jan 2012, 10:56:54 EST by Alexandra Simmonds on behalf of School of Geography, Planning & Env Management