Advantages and challenges of government, non-profit and for-profit approaches to eradications: Leveraging synergies by working together

Howald, G. R., Donlan, C. J., McClelland, P., Macdonald, N. and Campell, K. J. (2011). Advantages and challenges of government, non-profit and for-profit approaches to eradications: Leveraging synergies by working together. In: C. R. Veitch, M. N. Clout and D. R. Towns, Island Invasives: Eradication and Management: Proceedings of the International Conference on Island Invasives. International Conference on Island Invasives: Eradication and Management, Auckland, New Zealand, (432-436). 8 - 12 February 2010.

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Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
Author Howald, G. R.
Donlan, C. J.
McClelland, P.
Macdonald, N.
Campell, K. J.
Title of paper Advantages and challenges of government, non-profit and for-profit approaches to eradications: Leveraging synergies by working together
Conference name International Conference on Island Invasives: Eradication and Management
Conference location Auckland, New Zealand
Conference dates 8 - 12 February 2010
Proceedings title Island Invasives: Eradication and Management: Proceedings of the International Conference on Island Invasives
Place of Publication Gland, Switzerland
Publisher IUCN
Publication Year 2011
Sub-type Fully published paper
ISBN 9782831712918
Editor C. R. Veitch
M. N. Clout
D. R. Towns
Start page 432
End page 436
Total pages 5
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Abstract/Summary The removal of invasive mammals from islands has become a powerful tool for restoring ecosystems and preventing extinctions. As larger and more complex islands are being targeted for restoration, eradication campaigns will become even more complex and multidimensional – biologically, operationally, and fi nancially. Eradication projects are typically conducted by governmental conservation agencies (GCAs), non-governmental organisations (NGOs), or for- profi t enterprises (FPEs). Partnerships across these three organisational types are increasingly common. The organisational structure of the institutions involved in eradication and other restoration campaigns undoubtedly plays a role in the effectiveness and nature of outcomes. We briefl y explore the advantages and challenges of different organisational structures conducting invasive mammal eradication programmes. We do so to explore potential synergies that arise from strategic partnerships between different types of organisations. GCAs commonly enjoy special privileges, reliable operational budgets, and simplifi ed lines of communications – all of which are advantages to managing an eradication project. However, they often face challenges, including lack of experience, vulnerability to outside pressures, and a risk averse atmosphere. NGOs often have relative advantages in fundraising capacity and fl exibility. Their challenges include permitting, fundraising pressure, and less accountability. FPEs commonly enjoy less regulation and bureaucracy, have more operational fl exibility and excellence, and incentives for innovation. Limited project control, near-sighted investment, and risk avoidance can present them with challenges during eradication projects. Recent partnerships that executed watershed eradication campaigns over the last decade suggest that working together on island restoration programmes can leverage synergies. Partnering across organisational structures is likely to be a highly effective strategy for mainstreaming invasive species eradications.
Keyword Innovation
Partnerships
Organisational structure
Mainstreaming eradications
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Wed, 18 Jan 2012, 10:50:09 EST by Alexandra Simmonds on behalf of School of Geography, Planning & Env Management