The association between delusional-like experiences, and tobacco, alcohol or cannabis use: A nationwide population-based survey

Saha, Sukanta, Scott, James G., Varghese, Daniel, Degenhardt, Louisa, Slade, Tim and McGrath, John J. (2011) The association between delusional-like experiences, and tobacco, alcohol or cannabis use: A nationwide population-based survey. BMC Psychiatry, 11 . doi:10.1186/1471-244X-11-202


Author Saha, Sukanta
Scott, James G.
Varghese, Daniel
Degenhardt, Louisa
Slade, Tim
McGrath, John J.
Title The association between delusional-like experiences, and tobacco, alcohol or cannabis use: A nationwide population-based survey
Journal name BMC Psychiatry   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1471-244X
Publication date 2011-12-28
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1186/1471-244X-11-202
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 11
Total pages 35
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher BioMed Central
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background
Previous population-based studies have found that delusional-like experiences (DLE)
are prevalent in the community, and are associated with a wide range of mental health
disorders including substance use. The aim of the study was to explore the association
between DLE and three commonly used substances – tobacco, alcohol and cannabis.

Methods

Subjects were drawn from the Australian National Survey of Mental Health and
Wellbeing 2007. The Composite International Diagnostic Interview was used to identify
DLE, common psychiatric disorders, and substance use. We examined the relationship
between the variables of interest using logistic regression, adjusting for potential
confounding factors.

Results
Of 8 773 participants, 8.4% (n=776) subjects endorsed one or more DLE. With respect
to tobacco use, compared to nonusers, DLE were more common in those who (a) had
daily use, (b) commenced usage aged 15 years or less, and (c) those who smoked
heavily (23 or more cigarettes per day). Participants with cannabis use disorders were
more likely to endorse DLE; this association was most prominent in those with an onset
of 16 years or younger. In contrast, the pattern of association between DLE versus alcohol use or dependence was less consistent, however those with early onset alcohol
use disorders were more likely to endorse DLE probe items.

Conclusions

While cannabis use disorders have been previously linked with DLE, our findings linking
alcohol and tobacco use and DLE suggest that the influence of this substance on
psychosis-related outcomes warrants closer scrutiny in longitudinal prospective studies.
Keyword Delusional-like experiences
Smoke
Cannabis
Alcohol use or dependence
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Tue, 17 Jan 2012, 14:08:36 EST by Roheen Gill on behalf of UQ Centre for Clinical Research