“Oh, that's a bit of a nuisance”: Community-dwelling clients' perspectives of urinary continence health service provision

St John, Winsome, James, Heather and McKenzie, Shona (2002) “Oh, that's a bit of a nuisance”: Community-dwelling clients' perspectives of urinary continence health service provision. Journal of wound, ostomy, and continence nursing, 29 6: 312-319. doi:10.1067/mjw.2002.129074


Author St John, Winsome
James, Heather
McKenzie, Shona
Title “Oh, that's a bit of a nuisance”: Community-dwelling clients' perspectives of urinary continence health service provision
Journal name Journal of wound, ostomy, and continence nursing   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1071-5754
Publication date 2002-11
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1067/mjw.2002.129074
Volume 29
Issue 6
Start page 312
End page 319
Total pages 8
Place of publication United States
Publisher Mosby
Language eng
Subject 1117 Public Health and Health Services
Formatted abstract
Objective: This study explored clients' perspectives of urinary continence service provision for community-dwelling people from a primary health care perspective. Design: For this interpretive study, data were collected from 11 clients via in-depth interviews and a questionnaire eliciting demographic details and written comment. A focus group was also held with 7 people belonging to an existing continence self-help group. Results: Clients indicated that appropriate and acceptable continence care was accessible, affordable, and based on accurate knowledge. They valued practitioners who were empathetic, interested, had good networks, and could assist in practical ways. They looked for explanation, information, and discussion, often finding this when they accessed continence specialists. However, they often found it difficult to access this type of care, with many clients finding that urinary incontinence was treated as a secondary issue or a nuisance by generalist health practitioners. Clients believed that many health practitioners lacked knowledge and/or interest in urinary incontinence. In particular, there was very poor transitional care between hospital and community. The cost of consulting a health practitioner was seen as secondary to the cost of continence equipment and aids. Conclusions: This study found that the principles of primary health care were not being realized in generalist continence care. Client-centered services that address individual needs, relationships, psychological factors, emotional needs, financial circumstances, social contexts, and lifestyle factors, particularly in transition between sectors, are needed. (J WOCN 2002;29:312-9.)
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: School of Medicine Publications
School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 13 Apr 2006, 02:18:01 EST