Efficacy of a compulsory homework programme for increasing physical activity and healthy eating in children: The healthy homework pilot study

Duncan, Scott, McPhee, Julia C., Schluter, Philip J., Zinn, Caryn, Smith, Richard and Schofield, Grant (2011) Efficacy of a compulsory homework programme for increasing physical activity and healthy eating in children: The healthy homework pilot study. International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 8 : 127.1-127.10.


Author Duncan, Scott
McPhee, Julia C.
Schluter, Philip J.
Zinn, Caryn
Smith, Richard
Schofield, Grant
Title Efficacy of a compulsory homework programme for increasing physical activity and healthy eating in children: The healthy homework pilot study
Journal name International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1479-5868
Publication date 2011-11
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1186/1479-5868-8-127
Volume 8
Start page 127.1
End page 127.10
Total pages 10
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher BioMed Central
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Formatted abstract Background: Most physical activity and nutrition interventions in children focus on the school setting; however, evidence suggests that children are less active and have greater access to unhealthy food at home. The aim of this pilot study was to examine the efficacy of a compulsory homework programme for increasing physical activity and healthy eating in children.
Methods: The six-week 'Healthy Homework' programme and complementary teaching resource was developed under the guidance of an intersectoral steering group. Eight senior classes (year levels 5-6) from two diverse Auckland primary schools were randomly assigned into intervention and control groups. A total of 97 children (57 intervention, 40 control) aged 9-11 years participated in the evaluation of the intervention. Daily step counts were monitored immediately before and after the intervention using sealed multiday memory pedometers. Screen time, sports participation, active transport to and from school, and the consumption of fruits, vegetables, unhealthy foods and drinks were recorded concurrently in a 4-day food and activity diary.
Results: Healthy Homework resulted in a significant intervention effect of 2,830 steps.day-1 (95% CI: 560, 5,300, P = 0.013). This effect was consistent between sexes, schools, and day types (weekdays and weekend days). In addition, significant intervention effects were observed for vegetable consumption (0.83 servings.day-1, 95% CI: 0.24, 1.43, P = 0.007) and unhealthy food consumption (-0.56 servings.day-1, 95% CI: -1.05, -0.07, P = 0.027) on weekends but not weekdays, with no interactions with sex or school. Effects for all other variables were not statistically significant regardless of day type.
Conclusions: Compulsory health-related homework appears to be an effective approach for increasing physical activity and improving vegetable and unhealthy food consumption in children. Further research in a larger study is required to confirm these initial results
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Article # 127

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2012 Collection
School of Nursing and Midwifery Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 2 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 4 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 27 Abstract Views  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Mon, 16 Jan 2012, 12:06:36 EST by Vicki Percival on behalf of School of Nursing and Midwifery