Oxidation of atenolol, propranolol, carbamazepine and clofibric acid by a biological Fenton-like system mediated by the white-rot fungus Trametes versicolor

Marco-Urrea, Ernest, Radjenovic, Jelena, Caminal, Gloria, Petrovic, Mira, Vicent, Teresa and Barcelo, Damia (2010) Oxidation of atenolol, propranolol, carbamazepine and clofibric acid by a biological Fenton-like system mediated by the white-rot fungus Trametes versicolor. Water Research, 44 2: 521-532. doi:10.1016/j.watres.2009.09.049


Author Marco-Urrea, Ernest
Radjenovic, Jelena
Caminal, Gloria
Petrovic, Mira
Vicent, Teresa
Barcelo, Damia
Title Oxidation of atenolol, propranolol, carbamazepine and clofibric acid by a biological Fenton-like system mediated by the white-rot fungus Trametes versicolor
Formatted title
Oxidation of atenolol, propranolol, carbamazepine and clofibric acid by a biological Fenton-like system mediated by the white-rot fungus Trametes versicolor
Journal name Water Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0043-1354
1879-2448
Publication date 2010-01-01
Year available 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.watres.2009.09.049
Volume 44
Issue 2
Start page 521
End page 532
Total pages 12
Editor Thomas Ternes
Urs von Gunten
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher IWA Publishing
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Biological advanced oxidation of the pharmaceuticals clofibric acid (CA), carbamazepine (CBZP), atenolol (ATL) and propranolol (PPL) is reported for the first time. Extracellular oxidizing species were produced through a quinone redox cycling mechanism catalyzed by an intracellular quinone reductase and any of the ligninolytic enzymes of Trametes versicolor after addition of the lignin-derived quinone 2,6-dimethoxy-1,4-benzoquinone (DBQ) and Fe3+-oxalate in the medium. Time-course experiments with approximately 10 mg L−1 of initial pharmaceutical concentration resulted in percent degradations above 80% after 6 h of incubation. Oxidation of pharmaceuticals was only observed under DBQ redox cycling conditions. A similar degradation pattern was observed when CBZP was added at the environmentally relevant concentration of 50 μg L−1. Depletion of DBQ due to the attack of oxidizing agents was assumed to be the main limiting factor of pharmaceutical degradation. The main degradation products, that resulted to be pharmaceutical hydroxylated derivatives, were structurally elucidated. The detected 4- and 7-hydroxycarbamazepine intermediates of CBZP degradation were not reported to date. Total disappearance of intermediates was observed in all the experiments at the end of the incubation period.
Keyword Trametes versicolor
Pharmaceuticals
Hydroxyl radical
Carbamazepine
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ
Additional Notes Available online 22 September 2009. Special issue: Emerging Contaminants in water: Occurrence, fate, removal and assessment in the water cycle (from wastewater to drinking water)

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: ERA 2012 Admin Only
Advanced Water Management Centre Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 12 Jan 2012, 23:15:30 EST by Dr Jelena Radjenovic on behalf of Advanced Water Management Centre