China - peaceful rise or quest for power?

Vaughan, Michael (2012). China - peaceful rise or quest for power?. The University of Queensland.

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Title China - peaceful rise or quest for power?
Abstract/Summary In spite of lofty rhetoric from senior CCP Politburo Members, China is an authoritarian one party state, mired in corruption, income inequality and denial of human rights. It has had large economic success, which its rulers hope will keep them in power. China is expanding its armed forces whilst stressing that they are "purely defensive" and that China seeks friendly cooperation with its neighours. It seeks to counter US influence in the Asia-Pacific and to advance its own interests. The pertinent question for analysts and policymakers is will the CCP regime eventually supplant the US or be overthrown by those it subjugates?
Keyword Chinese Communist Party
Corruption
Human Rights Violations
Military Expansion
"People's War" Concept and Strategic Thinking
Domestic and International Policy Objectives
Publisher The University of Queensland
Date 2012-01-11
Research Fields, Courses and Disciplines 16 Studies in Human Society
18 Law and Legal Studies
Author Vaughan, Michael
Open Access Status Other
Additional Notes This Article is illustrated with numerous photographic images and statistical tables. The purpose of such illustrations is to clarify the textual argument. China is rapidly approaching world power status. The question Dr Vaughan asks is will the defects of this harshly authoritarian system ultimately cause its collapse - as took place with the GDR and the USSR - one party states that finally outlived their own sustainability.

Document type: Generic Document
Collection: School of Political Science and International Studies Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 11 Jan 2012, 19:01:01 EST by Dr Michael Vaughan on behalf of School of Political Science & Internat'l Studies