Blood, timber, and the state in West Kalimantan, Indonesia

van Klinken, Gerry (2008). Blood, timber, and the state in West Kalimantan, Indonesia. In: Special issue: Natural Resources and Violent Ethnic Conflicts in the Asia Pacific Region. Workshop on Natural Resources and Violent Ethnic Conflicts in the Asia Pacific Region, Honolulu, HI, United States, (35-47). 18–20 March 2005. doi:10.1111/j.1467-8373.2008.00359.x


Author van Klinken, Gerry
Title of paper Blood, timber, and the state in West Kalimantan, Indonesia
Conference name Workshop on Natural Resources and Violent Ethnic Conflicts in the Asia Pacific Region
Conference location Honolulu, HI, United States
Conference dates 18–20 March 2005
Proceedings title Special issue: Natural Resources and Violent Ethnic Conflicts in the Asia Pacific Region   Check publisher's open access policy
Journal name Asia Pacific Viewpoint   Check publisher's open access policy
Place of Publication Richmond, Vic., Australia
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Asia
Publication Year 2008
Sub-type Fully published paper
DOI 10.1111/j.1467-8373.2008.00359.x
ISSN 1360-7456
1467-8373
Volume 49
Issue 1
Start page 35
End page 47
Total pages 13
Language eng
Abstract/Summary West Kalimantan (West Borneo) has a history of violent communal conflict.1 It also has extensive forests that have been looted for decades. The argument will be that these two are linked, but not by the grievances of the forest dwellers. Except in its first few days, the two main episodes of 1997 and 1999 were not driven mainly by grievances among marginal groups. Rather, explanations based on the ‘resource curse’ carry more weight. These focus attention on the contested nature of the state, rather than on rebellious activities of marginal groups. When state institutions were thrown into disarray by the sudden resignation of President Suharto in 1998, Dayak militants already close to state power rewrote the rules of local politics by demonstratively ‘cleansing’ certain areas of an unpopular immigrant minority. This theatrical manoeuvre impressed political rivals sufficiently to allow Dayaks to gain control over several timber-rich districts, which had a thriving black economy. Malays later imitated these techniques to stem the tide.
Keyword Communal conflict
Grievances
Political ecology
Resource curse
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Conference Paper
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