Relationships between physiological, anthropometric, and skill qualities and playing performance in professional rugby league players

Gabbett, Tim J., Jenkins, David G. and Abernethy, Bruce (2011) Relationships between physiological, anthropometric, and skill qualities and playing performance in professional rugby league players. Journal of Sports Sciences, 29 15: 1655-1664. doi:10.1080/02640414.2011.610346


Author Gabbett, Tim J.
Jenkins, David G.
Abernethy, Bruce
Title Relationships between physiological, anthropometric, and skill qualities and playing performance in professional rugby league players
Journal name Journal of Sports Sciences   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0264-0414
1466-447X
Publication date 2011-12
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/02640414.2011.610346
Volume 29
Issue 15
Start page 1655
End page 1664
Total pages 10
Place of publication Abingdon, Oxon, United Kingdom
Publisher Routledge
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Formatted abstract
In this study, we investigated the relationship between physiological, anthropometric, and skill qualities and playing performance in professional rugby league players. Fifty-eight high-performance rugby league players underwent measurements for anthropometry (height, body mass, sum of seven skinfolds), physiological (speed, change of direction speed, lower body muscular power, repeated-sprint ability, prolonged high-intensity intermittent running ability, and estimated maximal aerobic power), technical skill (tackling proficiency, draw and pass proficiency), and perceptual skill (reactive agility, pattern recall, pattern prediction) qualities. National Rugby League matches were coded for attacking (e.g. line breaks, try assists, etc.) and defensive (e.g. missed tackles, tackling efficiency, etc.) statistics commonly used to assess rugby league playing performance. The number of line break assists was significantly associated (P < 0.05) with greater playing experience (r = 0.36), dual-task draw and pass proficiency (r = 0.54), reactive agility (r = 0.29), and pattern recall (r = 0.32) and prediction (r = 0.28) ability, while faster speed over 40 m (r = −0.42) was associated (P < 0.05) with a higher number of tries scored. Greater age and playing experience, better lower body muscular power, and faster 10 m and 40 m speed were significantly associated (P < 0.05) with the number of tackle attempts (positive), tackles completed (positive), and proportion of missed tackles (negative). These findings demonstrate that well-developed physical and skill qualities are associated with effective playing performance in National Rugby League players.
Keyword Fitness
Skill
Expertise
Team sport
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2012 Collection
School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 04 Jan 2012, 07:02:14 EST by Dr David Jenkins on behalf of School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences