The double crush syndrome revisited - A Delphi study to reveal current expert views on mechanisms underlying dual nerve disorders

Schmid, Annina B. and Coppieters, Michel W. (2011) The double crush syndrome revisited - A Delphi study to reveal current expert views on mechanisms underlying dual nerve disorders. Manual Therapy, 16 6: 557-562. doi:10.1016/j.math.2011.05.005


Author Schmid, Annina B.
Coppieters, Michel W.
Title The double crush syndrome revisited - A Delphi study to reveal current expert views on mechanisms underlying dual nerve disorders
Journal name Manual Therapy   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1356-689X
1532-2769
Publication date 2011-12
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.math.2011.05.005
Volume 16
Issue 6
Start page 557
End page 562
Total pages 6
Place of publication Kidlington, United Kingdom
Publisher Churchill Livingstone
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Abstract A high prevalence of dual nerve disorders is frequently reported. How a secondary nerve disorder may develop following a primary nerve disorder remains largely unknown. Although still frequently cited, most explanatory theories were formulated many years ago. Considering recent advances in neuroscience, it is uncertain whether these theories still reflect current expert opinion. A Delphi study was conducted to update views on potential mechanisms underlying dual nerve disorders. In three rounds, seventeen international experts in the field of peripheral nerve disorders were asked to list possible mechanisms and rate their plausibility. Mechanisms with a median plausibility rating of 7 out of 10 were considered highly plausible. The experts identified fourteen mechanisms associated with a first nerve disorder that may predispose to the development of another nerve disorder. Of these fourteen mechanisms, nine have not previously been linked to double crush. Four mechanisms were considered highly plausible (impaired axonal transport, ion channel up or downregulation, inflammation in the dorsal root ganglia and neuroma-in-continuity). Eight additional mechanisms were listed which are not triggered by a primary nerve disorder, but may render the nervous system more vulnerable to multiple nerve disorders, such as systemic diseases and neurotoxic medication. Even though many mechanisms were classified as plausible or highly plausible, overall plausibility ratings varied widely. Experts indicated that a wide range of mechanisms has to be considered to better understand dual nerve disorders. Previously listed theories cannot be discarded, but may be insufficient to explain the high prevalence of dual nerve disorders.
Keyword Double crush syndrome
Nerve compression syndromes
Neuropathic pain
Delphi study
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2012 Collection
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 10 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 16 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Tue, 27 Dec 2011, 08:09:15 EST by System User on behalf of School of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences