Loving Leviathan: The discourse of whale watching in an Australian eco-tourist location

Peace, Adrian (2005). Loving Leviathan: The discourse of whale watching in an Australian eco-tourist location. In John Knight (Ed.), Animals in person: Cultural perspectives on human-animal intimacies (pp. 191-210) London, United Kingdom: Berg.

Author Peace, Adrian
Title of chapter Loving Leviathan: The discourse of whale watching in an Australian eco-tourist location
Title of book Animals in person: Cultural perspectives on human-animal intimacies
Place of Publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Berg
Publication Year 2005
Sub-type Other
ISBN 1859737285
9781859737286
1859737331
9781859737330
Editor John Knight
Chapter number 9
Start page 191
End page 210
Total pages 20
Total chapters 12
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
Our relationship with animals is complex and contradictory; we hunt, kill and eat them, yet we also love, respect and protect them. This ambivalent relationship is further complicated by the fact that we attribute human emotions and intelligence to animals. We even go as far as likening them to children and treating them as family members.

Drawing on a diverse range of case studies, Animals in Person attempts to unravel our close and fascinating link with the animal kingdom. This book highlights the theme of cross-species intimacy in contexts such as livestock care, pet keeping, and the use of animals in tourism. The studies draw on data from different parts of the world, including New Guinea, Nepal, India, Japan, Greece, Britain, The Netherlands and Australia. Animals in Person documents the existence of relations between humans and animals that, in many respects, recall relations among humans themselves. [Book summary from publisher]
Q-Index Code BX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Book Chapter
Collections: ERA 2012 Admin Only
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Created: Tue, 20 Dec 2011, 14:29:05 EST by Debbie Lim on behalf of School of Social Science