Mismatch negativity (MMN) reduction in schizophrenia-Impaired prediction-error generation, estimation or salience?

Todd, Juanita, Michie, Patricia T., Schall, Ulrich, Ward, Philip B. and Catts, Stanley V. (2012) Mismatch negativity (MMN) reduction in schizophrenia-Impaired prediction-error generation, estimation or salience?. International Journal of Psychophysiology, 83 2: 222-231. doi:10.1016/j.ijpsycho.2011.10.003


Author Todd, Juanita
Michie, Patricia T.
Schall, Ulrich
Ward, Philip B.
Catts, Stanley V.
Title Mismatch negativity (MMN) reduction in schizophrenia-Impaired prediction-error generation, estimation or salience?
Journal name International Journal of Psychophysiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0167-8760
1872-7697
Publication date 2012-02
Year available 2011
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1016/j.ijpsycho.2011.10.003
Volume 83
Issue 2
Start page 222
End page 231
Total pages 10
Editor Juanita Todd
Erich Schröger
István Winkler
Place of publication Amsterdam, Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Abstract The model of mismatch negativity (MMN) as a simple index of change detection has been superseded by a richer understanding of how this event-related potential (ERP) reflects the representation of the sound environment in the brain. Our conceptualization of why the MMN is altered in certain groups must also evolve along with a better understanding of the activities reflected by this component. The detection of change incorporates processes enabling an automatic registration of “sameness”, a memory for such regularities and the application of this recent acoustic context to interpreting the present and future state of the environment. It also includes “weighting” the importance of this change to an organism's behaviour. In this light, the MMN has been considered a prediction error signal that occurs when the brain detects that the present state of the world violates a context-driven expectation about the environment. In this paper we revisit the consistent observation of reduced MMN amplitude in patients with schizophrenia. We review existing data to address whether the apparent deficit might reflect problems in prediction error generation, estimation or salience. Possible interpretations of MMN studies in schizophrenia are linked to dominant theories about the neurobiology of the illness.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Available online 20 October 2011. Special issue - Predictive information processing in the brain: Principles, neural mechanisms and models.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: Official 2012 Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 15 Dec 2011, 10:53:31 EST by Matthew Lamb on behalf of School of Medicine