The Influence of Mood, Food Cues and Individual Differences in Eating Style, Personality and Hedonic Hunger on Eating Expectancies and Responses

Ameerah Binte Po'ad Mattar (). The Influence of Mood, Food Cues and Individual Differences in Eating Style, Personality and Hedonic Hunger on Eating Expectancies and Responses Professional Doctorate, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Ameerah Binte Po'ad Mattar
Thesis Title The Influence of Mood, Food Cues and Individual Differences in Eating Style, Personality and Hedonic Hunger on Eating Expectancies and Responses
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Thesis type Professional Doctorate
Supervisor Dr Natalie Loxton
Total pages 197
Language eng
Abstract/Summary The current study examined the effects of mood states, food cue exposure, and individual differences in eating styles, personality and hedonic hunger on implicit eating expectancies and eating-related responses, including the desire to eat and actual food intake. 109 female participants were shown either negative or neutral mood-inducing video clips. This was followed by exposure to either palatable or neutral food images, as well as an implicit measure of eating expectancies. Participants also completed self-report measures of eating styles, both the original and revised Reinforcement Sensitivity Theory (RST), and appetitive drive to consume palatable foods. Desire to eat was measured at three time points (baseline, following the mood manipulation procedure, and following the food cue exposure/implicit eating expectancies measure), while actual food intake was recorded at the final stage of the study. Results revealed that the desire to eat increased following exposure to palatable, but not neutral food cues. The effect of food cue exposure was strongest among participants with an external eating style and those high in hedonic hunger. Reward sensitivity and hedonic hunger were associated with implicit eating expectancies. Eating expectancies also mediated the relationships between reward sensitivity and emotional/external/disinhibited eating. Finally, only the revised Behavioural Inhibition System (r-BIS) was related to food intake, with higher r-BIS scores predicting less food consumption. There was limited support for the influence of negative mood on the desire to eat. These findings highlight the roles of eating styles, reward sensitivity, hedonic hunger and beliefs about eating in contributing to dysfunctional eating. Implications of the study are discussed.
Keyword Mood
Cues
Personality
Hedonic hunger
Eating

 
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Created: Fri, 09 Dec 2011, 12:39:56 EST by Ameerah Mattar on behalf of Faculty of Social & Behavioural Sciences