Size matters: Competitive emulation and the statue of Zeus at Olympia

Taraporewalla, Rashna (2011). Size matters: Competitive emulation and the statue of Zeus at Olympia. In Janette McWilliam, Sonia Puttock, Sonia Puttock and Rashna Taraporewalla (Ed.), The statue of Zeus at Olympia: New approaches (pp. 33-50) Newcastle upon Tyne, UK: Cambridge Scholars Publishing.

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Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
Author Taraporewalla, Rashna
Title of chapter Size matters: Competitive emulation and the statue of Zeus at Olympia
Title of book The statue of Zeus at Olympia: New approaches
Place of Publication Newcastle upon Tyne, UK
Publisher Cambridge Scholars Publishing
Publication Year 2011
Sub-type Research book chapter (original research)
ISBN 9781443829212
1443829218
Editor Janette McWilliam
Sonia Puttock
Sonia Puttock
Rashna Taraporewalla
Chapter number 3
Start page 33
End page 50
Total pages 18
Total chapters 13
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
The sanctuary of Zeus at Olympia was, among other things, an arena for competition. Here, the agonistic spirit which pervaded many aspects of Greek life manifested itself in numerous forms. During the eighth century B.C., an early phase in the history of the site, members of the elite competed for prestige and status through the dedication of elaborate tripods, emblems of conspicuous consumption. According to tradition, athletes from throughout the Greek world gathered at Olympia from 776 B.c., each coveting an Olympic victory and the promise of the perpetual kleos which attended it. Victors were permitted to erect a statue in their likeness, a highly esteemed honour, and these victory statues themselves became an outlet for the competitive urge, as city-states sought to advertise their eminence through the athletes who had won glory in their name. Poleis themselves could compete with each other. Treasuries and monuments commemorating military victories erected at the site promulgated the time and axioma of the city-state. [Extract from chapter]
Q-Index Code B1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Mon, 05 Dec 2011, 14:13:10 EST by Kimberly Dobson on behalf of School of Historical and Philosophical Inquiry