The dark side of light metals: Energy wasted and unnecessary CO2 emitted as a consequence of the re-oxidation of molten aluminium

Taylor, John A. (2011). The dark side of light metals: Energy wasted and unnecessary CO2 emitted as a consequence of the re-oxidation of molten aluminium. In: Hajo Dieringa, Norbert Hort and Karl Ulrich Kainer, Light Metals Technology V: Selected, peer reviewed papers from the 5th International Conference on Light Metals Technology. 5th International Conference on Light Metals Technology, Luneburg, Germany, (429-432). 19-22 July 2011. doi:10.4028/www.scientific.net/MSF.690.429

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Author Taylor, John A.
Title of paper The dark side of light metals: Energy wasted and unnecessary CO2 emitted as a consequence of the re-oxidation of molten aluminium
Formatted title
The dark side of light metals: Energy wasted and unnecessary CO2 emitted as a consequence of the re-oxidation of molten aluminium
Conference name 5th International Conference on Light Metals Technology
Conference location Luneburg, Germany
Conference dates 19-22 July 2011
Proceedings title Light Metals Technology V: Selected, peer reviewed papers from the 5th International Conference on Light Metals Technology   Check publisher's open access policy
Journal name Materials Science Forum   Check publisher's open access policy
Place of Publication Stafa-Zurich, Switzerland
Publisher Trans Tech Publications
Publication Year 2011
Sub-type Fully published paper
DOI 10.4028/www.scientific.net/MSF.690.429
ISBN 9783037851807
ISSN 0255-5476
Editor Hajo Dieringa
Norbert Hort
Karl Ulrich Kainer
Volume 690
Start page 429
End page 432
Total pages 4
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Abstract/Summary Aluminium is often referred to (quaintly, though sometimes disparagingly) as “solidified electricity”. By this, it is implied that we need to be cautious about aluminium and question its use since it is a very energy-intensive engineering material. Fortunately, solid aluminium and its alloys have also had good press, being highly versatile and durable in service and being readily recyclable (at about 5% of the energy required to produce the primary Al initially). However, the ground is shifting again and with the present growing focus on embodied energy and carbon footprints, aluminium’s processing and use is being revisited.
Keyword Molten aluminium
Oxidation
Dross
Melt loss
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Thu, 01 Dec 2011, 13:09:30 EST by Viviane Victoria Crosthwaite on behalf of Faculty Of Engineering, Architecture & Info Tech