Humidified high flow nasal cannulae: Current practice in Australasian nurseries, a survey

Hough, Judith L., Shearman, Andrew D., Jardine, Luke A. and Davies, Mark W. (2012) Humidified high flow nasal cannulae: Current practice in Australasian nurseries, a survey. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health, 48 2: 106-113. doi:10.1111/j.1440-1754.2011.02070.x


Author Hough, Judith L.
Shearman, Andrew D.
Jardine, Luke A.
Davies, Mark W.
Title Humidified high flow nasal cannulae: Current practice in Australasian nurseries, a survey
Journal name Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1034-4810
Publication date 2012-02
Year available 2011
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1111/j.1440-1754.2011.02070.x
Volume 48
Issue 2
Start page 106
End page 113
Total pages 8
Place of publication Oxford, England, U.K.
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Aim: Humidified High Flow Nasal Cannula (HHFNC) has been increasingly adopted as a new means of respiratory support throughout the world. However, evidence to support its safety and efficacy is limited. The aim of the present survey was to determine current practices regarding the usage of HHFNC by neonatologists in Australia and New Zealand.
Methods: Surveys were sent to all 167 neonatologists identified by the list of centres in the Australia and New Zealand Neonatal Network.
Results: A total of 157 surveys were sent to valid email addresses: 111 (71%) responded of which 105 (67%) had completed the questionnaire. HHFNC is used in 17 (63%) of neonatal intensive care units in Australia and New Zealand. It is most commonly used to reduce nasal trauma (91%) and provide continuous positive airways pressure (62%). The main perceived benefits of HHFNC were the easier application and care of the infant (86%), and improved tolerance by the baby (84%). Rain out leading to fluid instillation into the upper airway (59%) was the most common problem.
Conclusion: This survey has provided a snapshot of the practice of HHFNC usage in Australia and New Zealand in 2010 and has revealed that HHFNC use is widespread and that clinical practices are diverse. The majority of neonatologists acknowledge that there is limited evidence to support its efficacy and safety, and would be happy to participate in clinical trials to address how best to deliver HHFNC.
Keyword Continuous positive airways pressure
High flow nasal cannula
Infant
Newborn
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Article first published online: 7 APR 2011

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: Official 2012 Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 31 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 32 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Wed, 30 Nov 2011, 10:37:16 EST by Matthew Lamb on behalf of School of Medicine