Testing a model to help analysts understand, evaluate, and make inferences about health technology change

Stitzlein, Cara, Sanderson, Penelope, Beltran Orihuela, Cristina, Jack, Leanne and Venkatesh, Bala (2011). Testing a model to help analysts understand, evaluate, and make inferences about health technology change. In: 2011 Conference Edition. Human Factors and Ergonomics Society of Australia 47th Annual Conference 2011, Sydney, Australia, (44.1-44.6). November 2011.

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Author Stitzlein, Cara
Sanderson, Penelope
Beltran Orihuela, Cristina
Jack, Leanne
Venkatesh, Bala
Title of paper Testing a model to help analysts understand, evaluate, and make inferences about health technology change
Conference name Human Factors and Ergonomics Society of Australia 47th Annual Conference 2011
Conference location Sydney, Australia
Conference dates November 2011
Proceedings title 2011 Conference Edition
Journal name Ergonomics Australia
Place of Publication Baulkham Hills, N.S.W., Australia
Publisher Human Factors and Ergonomics Society of Australia
Publication Year 2011
Sub-type Fully published paper
ISSN 1033-1875
Volume 11
Start page 44.1
End page 44.6
Total pages 6
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
Background: Implementing new technologies in a hospital is difficult. The healthcare environment is complex, with many
factors for decision makers to consider before a new system is introduced. Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate a
modeling approach designed to help healthcare stakeholders evaluate the impact of electronic information technologies on
existing clinical work. We performed an initial test of an information flow and workflow model, evaluating its effectiveness
at providing descriptions, supporting evaluation, and supporting conjectures. Method: Hospital staff were interviewed
and a model of information flow and workflow of a critical care work context was developed from the interview data. We
then used a structured set of tests to probe non-healthcare participants’ ability to understand the model’s notation and
evaluate the work activities. Results: An analysis of participants’ responses indicated that although participants did not
understand some model symbols initially, once provided with a legend they could satisfactorily describe the information
flow and workflow represented in the model. The participants’ verbal reports of work activities and their perceptions of
the notation indicate which parts of the model were difficult to understand and suggest ways of improving this type of
representation. Conclusions: Initial support was found for the adequacy of our modeling approach. Results from this
study are being used to refine the model’s notation and structure. Next steps in the research are discussed, which include
a test with healthcare professionals to see if our approach helps stakeholders make decisions about the implementation of
new technologies.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Article # 44

 
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Created: Fri, 25 Nov 2011, 22:14:43 EST by Professor Penelope Sanderson on behalf of School of Information Technol and Elec Engineering