The effects of high temperatures on egg survival of Heliothis spp.

Qayyum, Abdul. (1985). The effects of high temperatures on egg survival of Heliothis spp. Master's Thesis, School of Land, Crop and Food Sciences, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Qayyum, Abdul.
Thesis Title The effects of high temperatures on egg survival of Heliothis spp.
School, Centre or Institute School of Land, Crop and Food Sciences
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 1985
Thesis type Master's Thesis
Supervisor Dr. Myron P. Zalucki
Total pages 58
Language eng
Subjects 07 Agricultural and Veterinary Sciences
Formatted abstract    The effects of exposure to high temperature on egg survival and rate of development were measured in Heliothis armigera Hübner and H. punctigera Wallengren.   

No adverse effect was observed on egg hatch at short exposures ( < 1h ) to temperatures of 44° C and below. 50 mortality may occur when the eggs of both species are exposed for ca 2 hours to 44° C. High humidity ( 100 % ) significantly influenced egg hatch in both species.   

Rate of development increased with exposure time at 35 °C but decreased at temperatures > 35° C. This retardation increased with longer exposures and higher temperatures. Overall H. punctigera eggs required more developmental time and heat units (degree-h) to hatch than H. armigera.    

The data could be used to simulate egg survival and development in the field under high summer temperatures conditions. 

Keyword Helicoverpa armigera
Heliothis punctiger
Additional Notes

Variant title: Egg survival in Heliothis spp.

 
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