A randomised control trial of short term efficacy of in-shoe foot orthoses compared to a wait and see policy for anterior knee pain and the role of foot mobility

Mills, Kathryn, Blanch, Peter, Dev, Priya, Martin, Michael and Vicenzino, Bill (2012) A randomised control trial of short term efficacy of in-shoe foot orthoses compared to a wait and see policy for anterior knee pain and the role of foot mobility. British Journal of Sports Medicine, 46 4: 247-252.


Author Mills, Kathryn
Blanch, Peter
Dev, Priya
Martin, Michael
Vicenzino, Bill
Title A randomised control trial of short term efficacy of in-shoe foot orthoses compared to a wait and see policy for anterior knee pain and the role of foot mobility
Journal name British Journal of Sports Medicine   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0306-3674
1473-0480
Publication date 2012-03
Year available 2011
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1136/bjsports-2011-090204
Volume 46
Issue 4
Start page 247
End page 252
Total pages 6
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher B M J Group
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Formatted abstract Objectives:
To investigate the short-term clinical efficacy of in-shoe foot orthoses over a wait-and-see policy in the treatment of anterior knee pain (AKP) and evaluate the ability of foot posture measures to predict outcome. Design: Single-blind, randomised control trial.

Participants:
Forty participants (18-40 years) with clinically diagnosed AKP of greater than 6-week duration, who had not been treated with orthoses in the previous 5 years. Intervention: Prefabricated orthoses perceived as most comfortable from a selection of 3 different hardness values compared with a wait-and-see control group. Outcome measures: Participant-perceived global improvement, Kujala Patellofemoral Score, usual and worst pain severity over the previous week and the Patient Specific Functional Scale measures at 6 weeks.

Results:

Foot orthoses produced a significant global improvement compared with the control group (p = 0.008, relative risk reduction = 8.47%, numbers needed to treat = 2). Significant differences also occurred in measures of function (standardised mean difference = 0.71). Within the intervention group, individuals who exhibited a change in midfoot width from weight bearing to non-weight bearing of >11.25 mm were more likely to report a successful outcome (correct classification 77.8%).

Conclusion:
This is the first study to show orthoses provide greater improvements in AKP than a wait-and-see approach. Individuals with greater midfoot mobility are more likely to experience success from treatment. Trial Registration: ACTRN12611000492954.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published Online First 18 September 2011.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2012 Collection
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 23 Nov 2011, 10:42:22 EST by Ms Kerry Mellifont on behalf of School of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences