“A house is a house…family is everything” Housing histories and housing preferences of Aboriginal Australians living in urban areas of Brisbane.

Saxena, Padmini (2011). “A house is a house…family is everything” Housing histories and housing preferences of Aboriginal Australians living in urban areas of Brisbane. Professional Doctorate, School of Social Science, Faculty of Social and Behavioural Sciences, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Saxena, Padmini
Thesis Title “A house is a house…family is everything” Housing histories and housing preferences of Aboriginal Australians living in urban areas of Brisbane.
School, Centre or Institute School of Social Science, Faculty of Social and Behavioural Sciences
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2011
Thesis type Professional Doctorate
Supervisor Prof David Trigger
Dr Patricia Short
Total pages 166
Total black and white pages 166
Language eng
Subjects 370402 Social and Cultural Geography
Abstract/Summary The dominant culture in Australia places particular significance on nuclear family, home, privacy, individual space and ownership of assets. In contrast Aboriginal cultural values emphasize the importance of country and place, extended kinship and family obligations, community assets held in trust for future generations. The research aims to explore and document the housing histories and housing preferences of Aboriginal individuals living in a major urban centre in Queensland (Brisbane), and their perspectives on housing market features such as policies, services and assistance programs that have supported or contested these preferences. Designed as an exploratory study based in a qualitative paradigm, the research study uses an interpretative phenomenological analysis approach to arrive at heuristic interpretations of in-depth interviews with a small number of Aboriginal people living in Brisbane. It seeks to understand how urban Aboriginals sustain their cultural life ways within urban dwelling spaces that are principally designed in accordance with the cultural priorities of the dominant culture. It presents the emergent and major themes identified through these engagements, and suggests ways for insuring that housing provision supports, rather than contests, the expressed housing preferences of Aboriginal people living in urban areas.
Keyword aboriginal housing
indigenous housing
urban housing
australia, queensland
aboriginal
lifestyle
Additional Notes Page 48 Landscape Page 49 Landscape

 
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Created: Tue, 22 Nov 2011, 16:37:40 EST by Padmini Saxena on behalf of Faculty of Social & Behavioural Sciences