Rapid kinetics to peak serum antibodies is achieved following influenza vaccination by dry-coated densely packed microprojections to skin

Chen, Xianfeng, Fernando, Germain J. P., Raphael, Anthony P., Yukiko, Sally R., Fairmaid, Emily J., Primiero, Clare A., Frazer, Ian H., Brown, Lorena E. and Kendall, Mark A. F. (2012) Rapid kinetics to peak serum antibodies is achieved following influenza vaccination by dry-coated densely packed microprojections to skin. Journal of Controlled Release, 158 1: 78-84. doi:10.1016/j.jconrel.2011.10.026

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Author Chen, Xianfeng
Fernando, Germain J. P.
Raphael, Anthony P.
Yukiko, Sally R.
Fairmaid, Emily J.
Primiero, Clare A.
Frazer, Ian H.
Brown, Lorena E.
Kendall, Mark A. F.
Title Rapid kinetics to peak serum antibodies is achieved following influenza vaccination by dry-coated densely packed microprojections to skin
Journal name Journal of Controlled Release   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0168-3659
1873-4995
Publication date 2012-02-28
Year available 2011
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.jconrel.2011.10.026
Volume 158
Issue 1
Start page 78
End page 84
Total pages 7
Place of publication Amsterdam, Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Formatted abstract
A rapid time to peak serum antibody response following vaccination is particularly important for influenza: the time window between the availability of appropriate antigen and the start of the seasonal epidemic is very short. In this paper, influenza vaccine was delivered to both the epidermis and dermis of mouse skin using densely packed microprojection arrays for vaccination. We found that, after vaccination, around 75% and 90% of the delivered influenza vaccine migrated away from the ear skin within just 2 days and 1 week — respectively. And the time to peak serum antibody response was as early as 2 weeks. This result matches the kinetics achieved by intramuscular injection of liquid vaccine to muscle. Thus, we demonstrate that skin delivery of small vaccine volumes discretely by thousands of densely packed microprojections neither induces delay in kinetics nor interferes with the long-lasting antibody response; compared to conventional intramuscular injection.
Keyword Microprojections
Microneedles
Skin delivery
Needle-free vaccination
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Available online 29 October 2011

 
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Created: Tue, 22 Nov 2011, 16:12:47 EST by Germain Fernando on behalf of Aust Institute for Bioengineering & Nanotechnology