Cessation of hormone replacement therapy after reports of adverse findings from randomized controlled trials: Evidence from a British birth cohort

Mishra, Gita, Kok, Helen, Ecob, Russell, Cooper, Rachel, Hardy, Rebecca and Kuh, Diana (2006) Cessation of hormone replacement therapy after reports of adverse findings from randomized controlled trials: Evidence from a British birth cohort. American Journal of Public Health, 96 7: 1219-1225. doi:10.2105/AJPH.2005.071332


Author Mishra, Gita
Kok, Helen
Ecob, Russell
Cooper, Rachel
Hardy, Rebecca
Kuh, Diana
Title Cessation of hormone replacement therapy after reports of adverse findings from randomized controlled trials: Evidence from a British birth cohort
Journal name American Journal of Public Health   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0090-0036
1541-0048
Publication date 2006-07
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.2105/AJPH.2005.071332
Volume 96
Issue 7
Start page 1219
End page 1225
Total pages 7
Place of publication Washington, DC, United States
Publisher American Public Health Association
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objectives. We examined the cessation of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) among British women, by educational level, social class, and cardiovascular risk factors, at the time of publicity about 2 clinical trials of HRT that were halted after adverse findings.
Methods. A total of 1387 women aged 57 years reported their monthly HRT use between January 2002 and February 2003. A succession of regression-based time-series models were fitted to detect changes in the proportion of HRT users stratified by education level, social class, hypertension, and obesity.
Results. The overall percentage of HRT users declined from 31% in January 2002 to less than 26% by February 2003. Changes in trends of HRT use were first detected in June 2002 (for women with advanced secondary educational qualification or higher) and in July 2002 (for all other groups). The rate of decline was greatest for women with no formal educational qualifications, from the manual social class, or who were hypertensive or obese.
Conclusions. These decreases coincided with the announced cessation of a large US clinical trial of HRT. This publicity may have had a differential influence on the immediate decline in HRT use by various groups of British women.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: ERA 2012 Admin Only
School of Psychology Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 19 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 23 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Sat, 19 Nov 2011, 05:46:34 EST by System User on behalf of School of Public Health