Self-reported sleep difficulty during the menopausal transition: Results from a prospective cohort study

Tom, Sarah E., Kuh, Diana, Guralnik, Jack M. and Mishra, Gita D. (2010) Self-reported sleep difficulty during the menopausal transition: Results from a prospective cohort study. Menopause, 17 6: 1128-1135. doi:10.1097/gme.0b013e3181dd55b0


Author Tom, Sarah E.
Kuh, Diana
Guralnik, Jack M.
Mishra, Gita D.
Title Self-reported sleep difficulty during the menopausal transition: Results from a prospective cohort study
Journal name Menopause   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1072-3714
1530-0374
Publication date 2010-11
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1097/gme.0b013e3181dd55b0
Volume 17
Issue 6
Start page 1128
End page 1135
Total pages 8
Place of publication Philadelphia, PA, United States
Publisher Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objective: The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between menopausal transition status and self-reported sleep difficulty.
Methods: With the use of data on women participating in the Medical Research Council National Survey of Health and Development who have been followed up from birth in March 1946 (n = 962), relationships between menopausal transition status and self-reported sleep difficulty were assessed annually in women between ages 48 and 54 years.
Results: Menopausal transition status was related to severe self-reported sleep difficulty. The odds of reporting severe self-reported sleep difficulty were increased approximately by 2- to 3.5-fold (95% CI ranges from 1.08-3.27 to 1.99-6.04) for women in most menopausal transition statuses compared with women who remained premenopausal. After adjustment for current psychological, vasomotor, and somatic symptoms and waking frequently at night to use the toilet, only women who had a hysterectomy remained at an increased risk for moderate sleep difficulty.
Conclusions: The modest relationship between menopausal transition status and moderate sleep difficulty may be related to greater variation in individual definitions of moderate difficulty. Attention to the level of sleep difficulty in this group of women will assist in the decision to address current health symptoms versus sleep itself. Women without prior health problems may experience severe self-reported sleeping difficulty during the menopausal transition and require tailored care from health professionals.
Keyword Menopause
Hysterectomy
Sleep
Longitudinal
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: ERA 2012 Admin Only
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