Dietary patterns of adolescents and risk of obesity and hypertension

McNaughton, Sarah A., Ball, Kylie, Mishra, Gita D. and Crawford, David A. (2008) Dietary patterns of adolescents and risk of obesity and hypertension. Journal of Nutrition, 138 2: 364-370.

Author McNaughton, Sarah A.
Ball, Kylie
Mishra, Gita D.
Crawford, David A.
Title Dietary patterns of adolescents and risk of obesity and hypertension
Journal name Journal of Nutrition   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0022-3166
1541-6100
Publication date 2008-02-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
Volume 138
Issue 2
Start page 364
End page 370
Total pages 7
Place of publication Bethesda, MD, United States
Publisher American Society for Nutrition
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Increasingly, measures of dietary patterns have been used to capture the complex nature of dietary intake and investigate its association with health. Certain dietary patterns may be important in the prevention of chronic disease; however, there are few investigations in adolescents. The aim of this study was to describe the dietary patterns of adolescents and their associations with sociodemographic factors, nutrient intakes, and behavioral and health outcomes. Analysis was conducted using data collected in the 1995 Australian National Nutrition Survey of participants aged 12–18 y who completed a 108-item FFQ (n = 764). Dietary patterns were identified using factor analysis and associations with sociodemographic factors and behavioral and health outcomes investigated. Factor analysis revealed 3 dietary patterns labeled a fruit, salad, cereals, and fish pattern; a high fat and sugar pattern; and a vegetables pattern, which explained 11.9, 5.9, and 3.9% of the variation in food intakes, respectively. The high fat and sugar pattern was positively associated with being male (P < 0.001), the vegetables pattern was positively associated with rural region of residence (P = 0.004), and the fruit, salad, cereals, and fish pattern was inversely associated with age (P = 0.03). Dietary patterns were not associated with socioeconomic indicators. The fruit, salad, cereals, and fish pattern was inversely associated with diastolic blood pressure (P = 0.0025) after adjustment for age, sex, and physical activity in adolescents ≥16 y. This study suggests that specific dietary patterns are already evident in adolescence and a dietary pattern rich in fruit, salad, cereals, and fish pattern may be associated with diastolic blood pressure in older adolescents.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
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