Do childhood cognitive ability or smoking behaviour explain the influence of lifetime socio-economic conditions on premature adult mortality in a British post war birth cohort?

Kuh, Diana, Shah, Imran, Richards, Marcus, Mishra, Gita, Wadsworth, Michael and Hardy, Rebecca (2009) Do childhood cognitive ability or smoking behaviour explain the influence of lifetime socio-economic conditions on premature adult mortality in a British post war birth cohort?. Social Science & Medicine, 68 9: 1565-1573. doi:10.1016/j.socscimed.2009.02.006


Author Kuh, Diana
Shah, Imran
Richards, Marcus
Mishra, Gita
Wadsworth, Michael
Hardy, Rebecca
Title Do childhood cognitive ability or smoking behaviour explain the influence of lifetime socio-economic conditions on premature adult mortality in a British post war birth cohort?
Journal name Social Science & Medicine   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0277-9536
1873-5347
Publication date 2009-05
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.socscimed.2009.02.006
Volume 68
Issue 9
Start page 1565
End page 1573
Total pages 9
Place of publication Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Pergamon
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Poor childhood and adult socio-economic conditions, lower childhood cognitive ability and cigarette smoking are all associated with adult mortality risk. Using data on 4458 men and women aged 60 years from a British birth cohort study, we investigated the extent to which these risk factors are part of the same pathway linking childhood experience to adult survival. Compared with women from non-manual origins, men from non-manual origins, women and men from manual origins, and those with missing data on father's social class had about double the risk of mortality between 26 and 60 years. Cox proportional hazards models showed that these differences were reduced but remained significant after adjusting for childhood cognitive ability, adult socio-economic conditions and smoking. Higher childhood ability increased survival chances by securing better adult socio-economic conditions, such as home ownership, which was strongly associated with survival. These findings were similar for cardiovascular and cancer mortality.
Keyword Mortality
Socio-economic conditions
Childhood cognitive ability
Cigarette smoking
Birth cohort study
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: ERA 2012 Admin Only
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