Depression, physical function, and risk of mortality: National diet and nutrition survey in adults older than 65 years

Hamer, Mark, Bates, Christopher J. and Mishra, Gita D. (2011) Depression, physical function, and risk of mortality: National diet and nutrition survey in adults older than 65 years. American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 19 1: 72-78. doi:10.1097/JGP.0b013e3181df465e


Author Hamer, Mark
Bates, Christopher J.
Mishra, Gita D.
Title Depression, physical function, and risk of mortality: National diet and nutrition survey in adults older than 65 years
Journal name American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1064-7481
1545-7214
Publication date 2011-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1097/JGP.0b013e3181df465e
Volume 19
Issue 1
Start page 72
End page 78
Total pages 7
Place of publication Philadelphia, PA, United States
Publisher Lippincott Williams and Wilkins
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objective: The authors used an objective assessment of physical function and a range of sociodemographic, dietary, and health behaviors to explore the possible factors that could explain the association between depression and mortality in communitydwelling elderly participants aged 65 years and older.

Design:
Prospective follow-up of the National Diet and Nutrition Survey in older adults.

Setting:
Community sample.

Participants:
A total of 1,007 participants (522 men, 485 women; mean age: 76.4 ± 7.3 years).

Measurements:
Depression was assessed from the 15 item Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) and physical function using hand grip strength. Participants were followed up for death over an average of 9.2 years.

Results:
At baseline, 20.9% of participants demonstrated depression (GDS-15 score ≥5). Depressed participants were at a higher relative risk of all cause mortality during follow-up (age- and sexadjusted hazard ratio = 1.24, 95% confidence interval: 1.04–1.49). Other risk factors for depression also related to mortality included smoking, physical inactivity, and low grip strength. These factors collectively explained an estimated 54% of the association between depression and mortality. Low-grade inflammation and low plasma vitamin C were also independently associated with depression and mortality but did not explain any of the association between depression and mortality.

Conclusion:
Late-life depression is associated with a higher risk of mortality. Physical inactivity and physical dysfunction might partly mediate this association, although further longitudinal studies are required to fully elucidate these mechanisms. (Am J Geriatr Psychiatry 2010; 19:72–78)
Keyword Depression
Psychosocial risk
Grip strength
Community sample
Mortality
Health behavior
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Non HERDC
School of Public Health Publications
 
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