Strategic planning : its role and implementation in Veterinary Services Branch of the Queensland Department of Primary Industries

Walthall, J. C. (John Christopher) (1990). Strategic planning : its role and implementation in Veterinary Services Branch of the Queensland Department of Primary Industries Master's Thesis, School of Land, Crop and Food Sciences, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Walthall, J. C. (John Christopher)
Thesis Title Strategic planning : its role and implementation in Veterinary Services Branch of the Queensland Department of Primary Industries
School, Centre or Institute School of Land, Crop and Food Sciences
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 1990
Thesis type Master's Thesis
Supervisor Dr S. Chamala
Total pages 150
Language eng
Subjects 0701 Agriculture, Land and Farm Management
Formatted abstract

Public sector organisations need to satisfy competing demands of multiple stakeholders, often under changing circumstances.

Change can be caused by outside forces and it can also occur from within. Strategic planning is a disciplined effort to produce fundamental change that shapes and guides an organisation and helps it adapt to these changes.

As public sector organisations cannot satisfy every demand, they must prioritise. But to do this the organisation must establish what all stakeholders' needs are.

Most of the strategic planning models were developed for the private sector. Often the lack of clarity of mission, goals and performance indicators in the public sector creates the tendency for strategic planning in that sector to focus on activity and inputs. While strategic planning has obvious benefits for public sector organisations it is important that the process does not become an end in itself.

Essentially strategic planning helps an organisation to 

(1) scan the environment;

(2) select key issues;

(3) set mission statements or broad goals;

(4) undertake external and internal analysis;

(5) develop goals, objectives and strategies with respect to each issue;

(6) develop implementation plans to carryout strategic actions; and

(7) monitor, update and scan,

with the crucial differences from conventional planning being that strategic planning emphasises where the organisation ought to be going and what it should do.

The preparation of an organisation for change is becoming recognised as an essential pre-requisite for effective strategic planning. This entails consideration of the organisation's structure, its politics, its culture and the psychological aptitude and receptiveness of its members at all levels. Organisational leaders play a key role in effectively implanting strategic change. Some prescriptive tools are becoming available to help managers decide how to go about effecting this change.

Case studies of four similar organisations to Veterinary Services Branch indicated that strategic planning was effective in bringing about strategic change in those organisations. In three of the organisations the catalyst for this planning appeared to be the arrival of new branch managers but these organisations also perceived some threat in their expected future environments. Clearly the new managers saw strategic planning as a tool to help them manage their new roles and responsibilities.

In examining Veterinary Services Branch from the perspective of whether it should and could embark on strategic planning and a program management approach (as it is now required), the old Branch structure and roles were considered unsuitable for the focusing and integration needed for program management Considerable changes were considered necessary to facilitate a program management approach.

A matrix system for head office management was considered the most appropriate for delivering program management, but to implement this system necessitated a carefully planned approach to make sure that those involved had opportunity for input and to become committed to the concept. Once established, this matrix has facilitated strategic planning throughout the Branch. The crucial test, of course, will be whether these arrangements results in strategic thought and action by all members in the organisation. An examination of Branch culture cautions that, at the field level, staff may be reluctant to embark on the more ambiguous aspects of strategic planning. d it can also occur from within. Strategic planning is a disciplined effort to produce fundamental change that shapes and guides an organisation and helps it adapt to these changes.

As public sector organisations cannot satisfy every demand, they must prioritise. But to do this the organisation must establish what all stakeholders' needs are.

Most of the strategic planning models were developed for the private sector. Often the lack of clarity of mission, goals and performance indicators in the public sector creates the tendency for strategic planning in that sector to focus on activity and inputs. While strategic planning has obvious benefits for public sector organisations it is important that the process does not become an end in itself.

Essentially strategic planning helps an organisation to

(1) scan the environment;

(2) select key issues;

(3) set mission statements or broad goals;

(4) undertake external and internal analysis;

(5) develop goals, objectives and strategies with respect to each issue;

(6) develop implementation plans to carryout strategic actions; and

(7) monitor, update and scan,

with the crucial differences from conventional planning being that strategic planning emphasises where the organisation ought to be going and what it should do.

The preparation of an organisation for change is becoming recognised as an essential pre-requisite for effective strategic planning. This entails consideration of the organisation's structure, its politics, its culture and the psychological aptitude and receptiveness of its members at all levels. Organisational leaders play a key role in effectively implanting strategic change. Some prescriptive tools are becoming available to help managers decide how to go about effecting this change.

Case studies of four similar organisations to Veterinary Services Branch indicated that strategic planning was effective in bringing about strategic change in those organisations. In three of the organisations the catalyst for this planning appeared to be the arrival of new branch managers but these organisations also perceived some threat in their expected future environments. Clearly the new managers saw strategic planning as a tool to help them manage their new roles and responsibilities.

In examining Veterinary Services Branch from the perspective of whether it should and could embark on strategic planning and a program management approach (as it is now required), the old Branch structure and roles were considered unsuitable for the focusing and integration needed for program management Considerable changes were considered necessary to facilitate a program management approach.

A matrix system for head office management was considered the most appropriate for delivering program management, but to implement this system necessitated a carefully planned approach to make sure that those involved had opportunity for input and to become committed to the concept. Once established, this matrix has facilitated strategic planning throughout the Branch. The crucial test, of course, will be whether these arrangements results in strategic thought and action by all members in the organisation. An examination of Branch culture cautions that, at the field level, staff may be reluctant to embark on the more ambiguous aspects of strategic planning.

Keyword Queensland. Veterinary Services Branch -- Planning
Strategic planning -- Queensland

Document type: Thesis
Collection: UQ Theses (non-RHD) - UQ staff and students only
 
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Created: Mon, 14 Nov 2011, 09:41:42 EST by Ren Zhuge on behalf of Scholarly Communication and Digitisation Service