Challenging the distal-to-proximal cannulation technique for administration of anticancer therapies: A prospective cohort study

Chan, Raymond Javan, Alexander, Alison, Bransdon, Maree, Webster, Joan, Hughes, Brett Gordon Maxwell, Brown, Leisa and Graham, Therese (2012) Challenging the distal-to-proximal cannulation technique for administration of anticancer therapies: A prospective cohort study. Cancer Nursing, 35 5: E35-E40. doi:10.1097/NCC.0b013e3182352916

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Author Chan, Raymond Javan
Alexander, Alison
Bransdon, Maree
Webster, Joan
Hughes, Brett Gordon Maxwell
Brown, Leisa
Graham, Therese
Title Challenging the distal-to-proximal cannulation technique for administration of anticancer therapies: A prospective cohort study
Journal name Cancer Nursing   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0162-220X
1538-9804
Publication date 2012-09
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1097/NCC.0b013e3182352916
Volume 35
Issue 5
Start page E35
End page E40
Total pages 6
Place of publication Philadelphia, PA, U.S.A.
Publisher Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Formatted abstract Background: Distal-to-proximal technique has been recommended for anticancer therapy administration. There is no evidence to suggest that a 24-hour delay of treatment is necessary for patients with a previous venous puncture proximal to the administration site.

Objectives: This study aims to identify if the practice of 24-hour delay between a venous puncture and subsequent cannulation for anticancer therapies at a distal site is necessary for preventing extravasation.

Methods: A prospective cohort study was conducted with 72 outpatients receiving anticancer therapy via an administration site distal to at least 1 previous venous puncture on the same arm in a tertiary cancer center in Australia. Participants were interviewed and assessed at baseline data before treatment and on day 7 for incidence of extravasation/phlebitis.

Results: Of 72 participants with 99 occasions of treatment, there was 1 incident of infiltration (possible extravasation) at the venous puncture site proximal to the administration site and 2 incidents of phlebitis at the administration site.

Conclusion: A 24-hour delay is unnecessary if an alternative vein can be accessed for anticancer therapy after a proximal venous puncture.

Implications for Practice: Infiltration can occur at a venous puncture site proximal to an administration site in the same vein. However, the nurse can administer anticancer therapy at a distal site if the nurse can confidently determine that the vein of choice is not in any way connected to the previous puncture site through visual inspection and palpation.
Keyword Ambulatory cancer care center
Anticancer therapy
Cancer
Cytotoxic
Extravasation
Infiltration
Intravenous administration
Nursing assessment
Venous puncture assessment tool
Vesicant
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Publish Ahead of Print, POST AUTHOR CORRECTIONS, 2 November 2011

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2012 Collection
School of Medicine Publications
School of Nursing and Midwifery Publications
 
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Created: Sat, 12 Nov 2011, 07:41:37 EST by Dr Raymond Chan on behalf of School of Nursing and Midwifery