Holocene dust deposition rates record the interplay between aridity, position of the mid-latitude westerlies, and a major agriculture induced wind erosion in the Murray-Darling Basin, Australia

Marx, Samuel K., Kamber, Balz S., McGowan, Hamish A. and Denholm, John (2011) Holocene dust deposition rates record the interplay between aridity, position of the mid-latitude westerlies, and a major agriculture induced wind erosion in the Murray-Darling Basin, Australia. Quaternary Science Reviews, 30 23-24: 3290-3305. doi:10.1016/j.quascirev.2011.07.015


Author Marx, Samuel K.
Kamber, Balz S.
McGowan, Hamish A.
Denholm, John
Title Holocene dust deposition rates record the interplay between aridity, position of the mid-latitude westerlies, and a major agriculture induced wind erosion in the Murray-Darling Basin, Australia
Journal name Quaternary Science Reviews   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0277-3791
1873-457X
Publication date 2011-11
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.quascirev.2011.07.015
Volume 30
Issue 23-24
Start page 3290
End page 3305
Total pages 16
Place of publication Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Pergamon
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Abstract Millennial scale variability in the strength/position of the mid-latitude westerlies, as interpreted from rates of dust deposition in an alpine mire south-eastern Australia, is demonstrated to be a major driver of climate variability during the mid to late Holocene. Dust deposition rates were calculated with a trace element provenance model. This approach is capable of distinguishing between sedimentation of local alluvium and genuine deposition of aeolian dust into the studied mire. Low dust deposition from 6500 to 5500 cal. BP occurred during a period of enhanced south-westerly winds which advected moisture into south-eastern Australia resulting in wet conditions. A subsequent dust pulse at 5500-4000 cal. BP is interpreted as a relaxation in south-westerlies resulting in a more arid phase and possibly enhanced climate variability. Reduced dust deposition between 4000 and 2000 cal. BP indicates a return to increased precipitation/moisture in the lower MDB associated with increased south-westerly geostrophic flow. The onset of more arid conditions after 2000 cal. BP implies a reduction in the frequency of precipitation bearing south-westerly winds. A final further significant finding from this study is the identification of a major dust deposition/wind erosion episode coinciding with the onset of European land clearing and agriculture in Australia.
Keyword Westerlies
Aridity
Wind erosion
Palaeoclimate
Trace element
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: School of Geography, Planning and Environmental Management Publications
Official 2012 Collection
 
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Created: Fri, 11 Nov 2011, 15:47:18 EST by Alexandra Simmonds on behalf of School of Geography, Planning & Env Management