Development and regulation of cell-mediated immune responses to the blood stages of malaria: Implications for vaccine research

Good, Michael F., Xu, Huji, Wykes, Michelle and Engwerda, Christian R. (2005) Development and regulation of cell-mediated immune responses to the blood stages of malaria: Implications for vaccine research. Annual Review of Immunology, 23 66-69. doi:10.1146/annurev.immunol.23.021704.115638


Author Good, Michael F.
Xu, Huji
Wykes, Michelle
Engwerda, Christian R.
Title Development and regulation of cell-mediated immune responses to the blood stages of malaria: Implications for vaccine research
Journal name Annual Review of Immunology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0732-0582
1545-3278
ISBN 9780824330231
Publication date 2005-04
Year available 2004
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1146/annurev.immunol.23.021704.115638
Open Access Status
Volume 23
Start page 66
End page 69
Total pages 4
Place of publication Palo Alto, CA, United States
Publisher Annual Reviews
Language eng
Abstract The immune response to the malaria parasite is complex and poorly understood. Although antibodies and T cells can control parasite growth in model systems, natural immunity to malaria in regions of high endemicity takes several years to develop. Variation and polymorphism of antibody target antigens are known to impede immune responses, but these factors alone cannot account for the slow acquisition of immunity. In human and animal model systems, cell-mediated responses can control parasite growth effectively, but such responses are regulated by parasite load via direct effects on dendritic cells and possibly on T and B cells as well. Furthermore, high parasite load is associated with pathology, and cell-mediated responses may also harm the host. Inflammatory cytokines have been implicated in the pathogenesis of cerebral malaria, anemia, weight loss, and respiratory distress in malaria. Immunity without pathology requires rapid parasite clearance, effective regulation of the inflammatory antiparasite effects of cellular responses, and the eventual development of a repertoire of antibodies effective against multiple strains. Data suggest that this may be hastened by exposure to malaria antigens in low dose, leading to augmented cellular immunity and rapid parasite clearance.
Keyword Apoptosis
CD4 cells
Cytokines
Malaria
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ
Additional Notes First published online as a Review in Advance on September 22, 2004

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: ERA 2012 Admin Only
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