Quantifying the relationships of blood pressure with weight, height and body mass index in Chinese children and adolescents

Ma,Jun, Wang, Zhiqiang, Dong, Bin, Song, Yi, Hu, Peijin and Zhang, Bing (2012) Quantifying the relationships of blood pressure with weight, height and body mass index in Chinese children and adolescents. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health, 48 5: 413-418. doi:10.1111/j.1440-1754.2011.02221.x


Author Ma,Jun
Wang, Zhiqiang
Dong, Bin
Song, Yi
Hu, Peijin
Zhang, Bing
Title Quantifying the relationships of blood pressure with weight, height and body mass index in Chinese children and adolescents
Journal name Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1034-4810
1440-1754
Publication date 2012-05-01
Year available 2011
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1440-1754.2011.02221.x
Volume 48
Issue 5
Start page 413
End page 418
Total pages 6
Place of publication Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Aim: The aim of this study was to quantify the relationships of height, weight and body mass index (BMI) with blood pressure (BP) levels in Chinese children and adolescents.

Methods: Height, weight, BMI and BP measurements were obtained from a nationally representative sample of 231 227 children aged 7–18 years. Body size measurements were converted to age- and sex-specific standard deviation (SD) scores. The relationships between body size and BP measurements were assessed using linear regression analysis.

Results: All body size measurements were significantly associated with BP levels. Systolic BP increased 4.14, 3.70 and 2.88 mmHg in boys and 2.98, 2.63 and 1.87 mmHg in girls, corresponding to 1 SD increase in weight, BMI and height, respectively. A similar pattern was also observed for diastolic BP. After adjustment for height, systolic BP increased substantially with increasing weight (3.96 mmHg/SD increase for boys and 2.92 mmHg for girls). With adjustment for weight, systolic BP increased slightly with 1 SD increase in height (0.27 mmHg for boys and 0.10 mmHg for girls). The strength of the association between a body size measurement and BP varied among different ages, peaked at 10–11 years in girls and around 12–14 years in boys.

Conclusions:
Weight is the most powerful driving force of BP in children and adolescents, followed by BMI and height. Height has little impact on BP in children with a given weight, while weight has considerable impact on BP in children with a given height.
Keyword Adolescent
Blood pressure
Body height
Body weight
Child abuse
Obesity
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Article first published online: 3 NOV 2011

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2012 Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 08 Nov 2011, 00:42:02 EST by Zhiqiang Wang on behalf of Medicine - Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital