A review of Australian human factors research and stakeholder opinions regarding mines of the future

Lynas, Danellie and Horberry, Tim (2011) A review of Australian human factors research and stakeholder opinions regarding mines of the future. Ergonomics Australia, 11 44: 1-5.

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Author Lynas, Danellie
Horberry, Tim
Title A review of Australian human factors research and stakeholder opinions regarding mines of the future
Journal name Ergonomics Australia
ISSN 1033-1875
Publication date 2011
Sub-type Article (original research)
Volume 11
Issue 44
Start page 1
End page 5
Total pages 5
Place of publication Baulkham Hills, NSW, Australia
Publisher Human Factors and Ergonomics Society of Australia
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background: This paper focuses on human factors in the mining and the minerals industry in Australia. It begins by outlining some of the key aspects of this occupational domain from a user-centred design or human element perspective. Within the industry, significant variation exists in terms of equipment used, mine designs, company policy and equipment procurement and modification procedures. Thus, the scope for human factors and ergonomics (HF/E) extends from physical ergonomics through to cognitive engineering and wider organisational interventions.
Aim:
This paper presents an overview of recent HF/E work in this domain in Australia, and then describes in more depth an ongoing research project. The aim of this research is to identify the emerging trends and HF/E issues associated with automated mining equipment, to obtain interviewee descriptions of their visions for “mines of the future” and gather information relevant to the organisational/social implications of this vision.
Method:
Using a semi-structured interview process, twenty interviews were conducted across a broad range of personnel associated with the implementation of automation into the mining sector. Interview questions were largely structured around asking the interviewee to identify what they believed were the emerging trends and HF/E issues associated with automated mining equipment.
Results: The following broad themes emerged from interviewee perceptions of “mines of the future”: technological implications, the associated skills required to operate the equipment, how the equipment would be maintained and organisational issues, such as the culture and workforce change. The overall results are presented in these broad themes.
Conclusions:
Overall, it is concluded that the minerals industry presents significant challenges and opportunities for HF/E professionals. Issues such as automation, safe design, and workforce skill requirements and organisational issues emerged as key areas of future research and development work.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Special Issue: "HFESA 2011 Conference Edition".

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Minerals Industry Safety and Health Centre Publications
Official 2012 Collection
 
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Created: Mon, 07 Nov 2011, 14:25:40 EST by Dr Tim Horberry on behalf of Minerals Industry Safety and Health Centre