Driver satisfaction with a modified proximity detection system in mine haul trucks following an accident investigation

Cooke, Tristan and Horberry, Tim (2011). Driver satisfaction with a modified proximity detection system in mine haul trucks following an accident investigation. In: Rebecca Mitchell, Proceedings of the 47th Annual Conference of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society. Synergy in Sydney...Creating Partnerships: 47th Annual Conference of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society of Australia, Sydney, Australia, (1-6). 7-9 November 2011.

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Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
Author Cooke, Tristan
Horberry, Tim
Title of paper Driver satisfaction with a modified proximity detection system in mine haul trucks following an accident investigation
Conference name Synergy in Sydney...Creating Partnerships: 47th Annual Conference of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society of Australia
Conference location Sydney, Australia
Conference dates 7-9 November 2011
Proceedings title Proceedings of the 47th Annual Conference of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society
Journal name Ergonomics Australia
Place of Publication Baulkham Hills, NSW, Australia
Publisher Human Factors and Ergonomics Society of Australia
Publication Year 2011
Sub-type Fully published paper
ISBN 0980306396
ISSN 1033-1875
Editor Rebecca Mitchell
Volume 2011 Conference Edition
Start page 1
End page 6
Total pages 6
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
Collisions involving heavy vehicles at mines continue to be common, often with serious consequences.
An emerging technology to prevent collisions is in-cab proximity detection systems. This paper builds on previous work
where a proximity detection system at an underground gold mine was analysed using a number of human factors methods.
After this work was completed, but before any changes were made to the interface, a collision occurred at the mine.
Aims: The initial aim of the research was to determine if the predicted issues with the interface and collision prevention
strategies were present in the accident. The secondary aim was to test driver acceptance of the interface changes made
in response. Method and results: The incident was analysed by direct interviews using a modified form of the Critical
Decision Method. The accident site was then viewed with the recreated vehicle positions. Twelve failings in collision
prevention risk controls, including proximity detection systems, were found. All of these failings were predicted by the
human factors methods. Some of the recommended changes were then made to the interface. Driver acceptance of these
changes was measured using a scale accepted and validated for on-road in-vehicle systems. Conclusions: The analysis of
the accident provides evidence that human factors methods can accurately predict issues with in-cab proximity detection
systems for mining equipment. Furthermore, it appears that these methods lead to design changes that are accepted by
drivers. More research is required to test if the changes are also effective.
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Open access peer-reviewed journal. Journal available at: http://www.ergonomics.org.au/resource_library/journal.aspx Paper available at: http://www.ergonomics.org.au/downloads/EA_Journals/2011_Conference_Edition/Cooke_T.pdf

 
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Created: Mon, 07 Nov 2011, 14:21:32 EST by Dr Tim Horberry on behalf of Minerals Industry Safety and Health Centre