What bacteria are living in my food? An open-ended practical series involving identification of unknown foodborne bacteria using molecular techniques

Prasad, Prascilla and Turner, Mark S. (2011) What bacteria are living in my food? An open-ended practical series involving identification of unknown foodborne bacteria using molecular techniques. Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education, 39 5: 384-390. doi:10.1002/bmb.20532

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Author Prasad, Prascilla
Turner, Mark S.
Title What bacteria are living in my food? An open-ended practical series involving identification of unknown foodborne bacteria using molecular techniques
Journal name Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1470-8175
1539-3429
Publication date 2011-09
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1002/bmb.20532
Volume 39
Issue 5
Start page 384
End page 390
Total pages 7
Place of publication Hoboken, NJ, U.S.A.
Publisher John Wiley & Sons
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Formatted abstract
This open-ended practical series titled “Molecular Identification of Unknown Food Bacteria” which extended over a 6-week period was designed with the aims of giving students an opportunity to gain an understanding of naturally occurring food bacteria and skills in contemporary molecular methods using real food samples. The students first isolated two unknown bacterial strains from two food sources from which they extracted DNA and performed PCR targeting the 16S rRNA gene. Gel electrophoresis was used to analyze both genomic DNA preparations and PCR products. Following purification of PCR products, DNA sequencing was carried out and sequence trace quality was analyzed. The students successfully identified the two unknown bacteria using the BLAST search engine and a wide variety of different organisms were found. Assessment of their understanding of the procedure and ability to explain their findings using supporting primary research literature was via an individually prepared written report. Feedback from students over 2 years (n = 52) in a questionnaire revealed that the practical series was an engaging learning experience and lead to perceived improvements in knowledge of molecular techniques and bioinformatics and also about commonly occurring bacteria in foods.
Keyword Molecular techniques
Food microbiology
Spoilage
Fermentation
Pathogen
Microorganisms
Microbiology
Epidemiology
Ecosystems
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Publication date: September/October 2011

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2012 Collection
School of Agriculture and Food Sciences
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 6 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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