Young, white and female : Understanding the identities and agendas of students in the context of teaching and learning Indigenous Australian women’s music and dance

Mackinlay, Liz (2005). Young, white and female : Understanding the identities and agendas of students in the context of teaching and learning Indigenous Australian women’s music and dance. In: David Forrest, A celebration of voices : XV national conference proceedings. 15th Australian Society for Music Education National Conference, Melbourne, Vic., Australia, (169-174). 2005.

Author Mackinlay, Liz
Title of paper Young, white and female : Understanding the identities and agendas of students in the context of teaching and learning Indigenous Australian women’s music and dance
Conference name 15th Australian Society for Music Education National Conference
Conference location Melbourne, Vic., Australia
Conference dates 2005
Proceedings title A celebration of voices : XV national conference proceedings
Place of Publication Parkville, Vic., Australia
Publisher Australian Society for Music Education
Publication Year 2005
Sub-type Fully published paper
ISBN 0957741359
9780957741355
0957741367
9780957741362
Editor David Forrest
Start page 169
End page 174
Total pages 6
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
According to Ellsworth (1997, p. 58), curricula and pedagogies are for someone – they have intended, imagined and desired audiences. She maintains that educators make decisions about the size, shape, processes and aspirations of curricula based on assumptions about what teachers think students know and don’t know, who they think they are, what motivates them, and what is relevant to them (Ellsworth, 1997, p. 58). In this paper I seek to understand who the students are who participate with me in a
tertiary course called “Indigenous Australian women’s music and dance” at the University of Queensland. I ask why are they there with me in that pedagogical moment, how and what do they hope to come to know about Indigenous Australian women’s performance traditions? Drawing upon the results of a student survey conducted at the beginning of 2000 and 2001 I explore the gender, class and racial identities of students to consider the personal, musical and political agendas that motivate them to participate in this course. Suggestions are then made about the types of pedagogical approaches which can be effectively used to teach students about Indigenous Australian women’s music and dance
and which open the possibility of performance in education as a space for personal development, musical knowledge and political transformation.
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Conference Paper
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Created: Fri, 28 Oct 2011, 07:03:45 EST by Liz Mackinlay on behalf of School of Education