Relative and absolute addressability of global disease burden in maternal and perinatal health by investment in R&D

Fisk, Nicholas M., Mckee, Martin and Atun, Rifat (2011) Relative and absolute addressability of global disease burden in maternal and perinatal health by investment in R&D. Tropical Medicine and International Health, 16 6: 662-668. doi:10.1111/j.1365-3156.2011.02778.x


Author Fisk, Nicholas M.
Mckee, Martin
Atun, Rifat
Title Relative and absolute addressability of global disease burden in maternal and perinatal health by investment in R&D
Journal name Tropical Medicine and International Health   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1360-2276
1365-3156
Publication date 2011-06
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-3156.2011.02778.x
Volume 16
Issue 6
Start page 662
End page 668
Total pages 7
Place of publication Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Abstract Maternal and perinatal disease accounts for nearly 10% of the global burden of disease, with only modest progress towards achievement of the Millennium Development Goals. Despite a favourable new global health landscape in research and development (R&D) to produce new drugs for neglected diseases, R&D investment in maternal/perinatal health remains small and non-strategic. Investment in obstetric R&D by industry or the not-for-profit sector has lagged behind other specialties, with the number of registered pipeline drugs only 1–5% that for other major disease areas. Using a Delphi exercise with maternal/perinatal experts in global and translational research, we estimate that equitable pharmaceutical R&D and public sector research funding over the next 10–20 years could avert 1.1% and 1.9% of the global disease burden, respectively. In contrast, optimal uptake of existing research would prevent 3.0%, justifying the current focus on health service provision. Although R&D predominantly occurs in high-income countries, more than 98% of the estimated reduction in disease burden in this field would be in developing countries. We conclude that better pharmaceutical and public sector R&D would prevent around 1/3 and 2/3, respectively, of the disease burden addressable by optimal uptake of existing research. Strengthening R&D may be an important complementary strategy to health service provision to address global maternal and perinatal disease burden.
Keyword Global disease burden
Maternal
Perinatal
Mortality
Systematic Analysis
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Article first published online: 7 April 2011.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: UQ Centre for Clinical Research Publications
Official 2012 Collection
 
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