Preferential Transmission of Paternal Alleles at Risk Genes in Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

Hawi, Ziarih, Segurado, Ricardo, Conroy, Judith, Sheehan, Karen, Lowe, Naomi, Kirley, Aiveen, Shields, Denis, Fitzgerald, Michael, Gallagher, Louise and Gill, Michael (2005) Preferential Transmission of Paternal Alleles at Risk Genes in Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder. The American Society of Human Genetics, 77 6: 958-965. doi:10.1086/498174


Author Hawi, Ziarih
Segurado, Ricardo
Conroy, Judith
Sheehan, Karen
Lowe, Naomi
Kirley, Aiveen
Shields, Denis
Fitzgerald, Michael
Gallagher, Louise
Gill, Michael
Title Preferential Transmission of Paternal Alleles at Risk Genes in Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder
Journal name The American Society of Human Genetics   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0002-9297
1537-6605
Publication date 2005-10-26
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1086/498174
Volume 77
Issue 6
Start page 958
End page 965
Total pages 8
Place of publication Cambridge, United States
Publisher Cell Press
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Family, twin, and adoption studies have demonstrated a significant genetic contribution to the etiology of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Pharmacological, neuroimaging, and animal-model findings suggest imbalances in monoaminergic (dopaminergic, serotonergic, and noradrenergic) neurotransmission in ADHD. We have examined monoaminergic candidate genes for possible genetic association with ADHD in the Irish population, focusing particularly on genes of the dopaminergic and serotonergic systems. We have observed that several of these genes are associated with ADHD, including DAT1, DBH, DRD4, DRD5, and 5HT1B. Here, we present what appears to be a systematic overtransmission of paternal alleles at candidate genes associated with ADHD. For the nine genes included in the analysis, the overall odds ratio for paternal transmission was 2, compared with 1.3 for maternal transmission (paternal vs. maternal x 2 = 9.6; P = .0019). Transmission to females, from either parent, was significantly stronger than to males. Possible reasons for this preferential transmission include imprinting and ascertainment bias, although results of further analyses show that the latter is unlikely.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Queensland Brain Institute Publications
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Created: Fri, 21 Oct 2011, 15:32:07 EST by Debra McMurtrie on behalf of Queensland Brain Institute