Application of ground penetrating radar to testing tunnel integrity

Karlovsek, J., Scheuermann, A., Muller, W. and Williams, D. J. (2011). Application of ground penetrating radar to testing tunnel integrity. In: Proceedings: 14th Australasian Tunnelling Conference: Development of Underground Space. 14th Australasian Tunnelling Conference: Development of Underground Space, Auckland, New Zealand, (529-541). 8-9 March 2011.

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Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
Author Karlovsek, J.
Scheuermann, A.
Muller, W.
Williams, D. J.
Title of paper Application of ground penetrating radar to testing tunnel integrity
Conference name 14th Australasian Tunnelling Conference: Development of Underground Space
Conference location Auckland, New Zealand
Conference dates 8-9 March 2011
Proceedings title Proceedings: 14th Australasian Tunnelling Conference: Development of Underground Space
Place of Publication Carlton, VIC, Australia
Publisher The Australasian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy
Publication Year 2011
Sub-type Fully published paper
ISBN 9781921522376
Issue 2
Start page 529
End page 541
Total pages 13
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
Civil engineering infrastructures are often subjected to different types of natural and mechanical activities. These influences may result in serviceability or even in stability of structures due to material deformations, increased water content within the materials used or the formation of internal or adjacent cavities that may threaten the infrastructure. Construction practices can lead to development of such defects in the form of cavities. In civil engineering it is crucial to detect these variations in material properties and to detect the presence of defects. However, as they are often hidden from view, these attributes may be difficult or impossible to target with traditional testing methods. For these reasons rapid geophysical methods, such as ground penetrating radar (GPR), are increasingly being used. At the University of Queensland (UQ) GPR is used for detection of voids and cavities which have been caused by an over excavation of the earth pressure balance machine (EPB) operating in a closed mode.

A variety of numerical simulations using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) methods and preliminary experiments have been carried out in order to specify information about the nature, type, size, location and other characteristics of targets to be detected by GPR. In doing this the difficulty of interpreting GPR data, which is mainly due to the complexity of the factors involved in multiple possible solutions of the observed features, can be overcome.
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Civil Engineering Publications
Official 2012 Collection
 
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Created: Fri, 21 Oct 2011, 15:22:15 EST by Dr Alexander Scheuermann on behalf of School of Civil Engineering