Genome mapping in intensively studied wild vertebrate populations

Slate, Jon, Santure, Anna W., Feulner, Philine G. D., Brown, Emily A., Ball, Alex D., Johnston, Susan E. and Gratten, Jake (2010) Genome mapping in intensively studied wild vertebrate populations. Trends in Genetics, 26 6: 275-284. doi:10.1016/j.tig.2010.03.005


Author Slate, Jon
Santure, Anna W.
Feulner, Philine G. D.
Brown, Emily A.
Ball, Alex D.
Johnston, Susan E.
Gratten, Jake
Title Genome mapping in intensively studied wild vertebrate populations
Journal name Trends in Genetics   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0168-9525
1362-4555
Publication date 2010-06
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1016/j.tig.2010.03.005
Volume 26
Issue 6
Start page 275
End page 284
Total pages 10
Place of publication London, U.K.
Publisher Trends Journals; Elsevier
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Over the past decade, long-term studies of vertebrate populations have been the focus of many quantitative genetic studies. As a result, we have a clearer understanding of why some fitness-related traits are heritable and under selection, but are apparently not evolving. An exciting extension of this work is to identify the genes underlying phenotypic variation in natural populations. The advent of next-generation sequencing and high-throughput single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping platforms means that mapping studies are set to become widespread in those wild populations for whom appropriate phenotypic data and DNA samples are available. Here, we highlight the progress made in this area and define evolutionary genetic questions that have become tractable with the arrival of these new genomics technologies.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collection: Queensland Brain Institute Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 21 Oct 2011, 14:32:56 EST by Jake Gratten on behalf of Queensland Brain Institute