Bhattacharya, Anjanabha, Rice, Nicole, Shapter, Frances M., Norton, Sally L. and Henry, Robert J. (2011). Sorghum. In Chittaranjan Kole (Ed.), Cereals (pp. 397-406) Heidelberg, Germany: Springer. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-14228-4_9

Author Bhattacharya, Anjanabha
Rice, Nicole
Shapter, Frances M.
Norton, Sally L.
Henry, Robert J.
Title of chapter Sorghum
Title of book Cereals
Place of Publication Heidelberg, Germany
Publisher Springer
Publication Year 2011
Sub-type Chapter in textbook
DOI 10.1007/978-3-642-14228-4_9
Series Wild Crop Relatives: Genomic and Breeding Resources
ISBN 9783642142277
Editor Chittaranjan Kole
Volume number 1
Chapter number 9
Start page 397
End page 406
Total pages 10
Total chapters 11
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
Sorghum is an important cereal and fodder crop, which is adaptable to extreme climatic conditions and soil types. The diverse wild Sorghum species represent valuable germplasm and are an important repository of genes, which can be exploited for crop improvement. They are resistant to a variety of diseases and pests. The 25 species include some that are able to be readily crossed with cultivated sorghum. They will also help us to understand the evolution and adaptations of the Sorghum genus. Wild Sorghum species also allow comparative genomic approaches for understanding the genetic basis of important phenotypes such as plant architecture, flowering, and grain yield. Sorghum species have a diverse array of useful traits that are available for use in sorghum improvement as a food, feed fodder, or industrial crop.
Q-Index Code BX
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Book Chapter
Collections: Non HERDC
Queensland Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation
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Created: Fri, 21 Oct 2011, 10:07:57 EST by Professor Robert Henry on behalf of Qld Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation