Food modelling systems to assess menus in well population groups: Not all black and white.

Hannan-Jones, Mary and Capra, Sandra (2011). Food modelling systems to assess menus in well population groups: Not all black and white.. In: Dietitians Association of Australia 29th National Conference. DAA 2011: Dietitians Association of Australia 29th National Conference. Evidence to Practice: Not Always Black or White, Adelaide, SA, Australia, (36-36). 26-28 May 2011. doi:10.1261/j.1747-0080.2011.01506.x


Author Hannan-Jones, Mary
Capra, Sandra
Title of paper Food modelling systems to assess menus in well population groups: Not all black and white.
Conference name DAA 2011: Dietitians Association of Australia 29th National Conference. Evidence to Practice: Not Always Black or White
Conference location Adelaide, SA, Australia
Conference dates 26-28 May 2011
Proceedings title Dietitians Association of Australia 29th National Conference   Check publisher's open access policy
Journal name Nutrition and Dietetics   Check publisher's open access policy
Place of Publication Richmond, VIC, Australia
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Asia
Publication Year 2011
Sub-type Published abstract
DOI 10.1261/j.1747-0080.2011.01506.x
ISSN 1032-1322
1446-6368
1747-0080
Volume 68
Issue Supp. 1
Start page 36
End page 36
Total pages 1
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
Food modelling systems such as the Core Foods and the Australian Guide to Healthy Eating are frequently used as nutritional assessment tools for menus in ‘well’ groups (such as boarding schools, prisons and mental health facilities), with the draft Foundation and Total Diets (FATD) the latest revision. The aim of this paper is to apply the FATD to an assessment of food provision in a long stay, ‘well’, group setting to determine its usefulness as a tool. A detailed menu review was conducted in a 1000 bed male prison, including verifi cation of all recipes. Full diet histories were collected on 106 prisoners which included foods consumed from the menu and self funded snacks. Both the menu and diet histories were analysed according to core foods, with recipes used to assist in quantifi cation of mixed dishes. Comparison was made of average core foods with Foundation Diet recommendations (FDR) for males.

Results showed that the standard menu provided suffi cient quantity for 8 of 13 FDRs, however was low in nuts, legumes, refi ned cereals and marginally low in fruits and orange vegetables. The average prisoner diet achieved 9 of 13 FDRs, notably with margarines and oils less than half and legumes one seventh of recommended. Overall, although the menu and prisoner diets could easily be assessed using the FDRs, it was not consistent with recommendations. In long stay settings other Nutrient Reference Values not modelled in the FATDS need consideration, in particular, Suggested Dietary Targets and professional judgement is required in interpretation.
Q-Index Code EX
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Conference Paper
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Created: Thu, 20 Oct 2011, 12:32:47 EST by Professor Sandra Capra on behalf of School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences