Investment and vested interests in neuroscience research of addiction: why research ethics requires more than informed consent

Miller, Peter, Carter, Adrian and De Groot, Florentine (2012). Investment and vested interests in neuroscience research of addiction: why research ethics requires more than informed consent. In Adrian Carter, Wayne Hall and Judy Illes (Ed.), Addiction neuroethics: the ethics of addiction neuroscience research and treatment (pp. 278-301) New York, NY, U.S.A.: Academic Press. doi:10.1016/B978-0-12-385973-0.00015-6

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Author Miller, Peter
Carter, Adrian
De Groot, Florentine
Title of chapter Investment and vested interests in neuroscience research of addiction: why research ethics requires more than informed consent
Title of book Addiction neuroethics: the ethics of addiction neuroscience research and treatment
Place of Publication New York, NY, U.S.A.
Publisher Academic Press
Publication Year 2012
Sub-type Research book chapter (original research)
DOI 10.1016/B978-0-12-385973-0.00015-6
Open Access Status
Year available 2011
ISBN 9780123859730
9780123859747
Editor Adrian Carter
Wayne Hall
Judy Illes
Chapter number 15
Start page 278
End page 301
Total pages 24
Total chapters 16
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
Most discussion about ethics in conducting neuroscience research of addiction involves the protection of the often vulnerable participants. Relevant ethical principles include respect for subjects’ rights, the obligation to protect them from harm as a result of participating in the study, and the opportunity to do good, e.g. providing access to health care and addiction treatment. The essential condition of research ethics is the process of obtaining informed consent. However, an ethical analysis of neuroscientific research must also consider its clinical and policy impact, and issues such as who commissions and pays for research raise substantial ethical questions. This chapter considers an issue seldom discussed in the research ethics literature: the role of invested interests and investment in influencing what is researched and how this research is portrayed. It then considers the current government investment in addiction research, and examines the challenge of prioritizing investment of limited societal resources in such research.
Q-Index Code B1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Wed, 19 Oct 2011, 16:38:56 EST by Mr Adrian Carter on behalf of UQ Centre for Clinical Research