Indirect evidence of the contribution of prenatal sex selection practices to the high sex ratio at birth in Vietnam

Pham, Bang Nguyen, Hall, Wayne and Hill, Peter Stewart (2011) Indirect evidence of the contribution of prenatal sex selection practices to the high sex ratio at birth in Vietnam. Journal of Population Research, 28 4: 293-299. doi:10.1007/s12546-011-9068-z


Author Pham, Bang Nguyen
Hall, Wayne
Hill, Peter Stewart
Title Indirect evidence of the contribution of prenatal sex selection practices to the high sex ratio at birth in Vietnam
Journal name Journal of Population Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1443-2447
1835-9469
Publication date 2011-06-22
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s12546-011-9068-z
Volume 28
Issue 4
Start page 293
End page 299
Total pages 7
Place of publication Dordrecht, Netherlands
Publisher Springer
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Formatted abstract
This paper reports indirect evidence that prenatal sex selection is a contributor to the recent increase in sex ratio at birth in Vietnam. The paper uses birth data from the Population Change Survey 2006 to assess the associations between sex ratio at birth and variables that predict increased opportunities to practise prenatal sex selection, including maternal knowledge of foetal sex before birth, the use of ultrasound for foetal sex determination, the gestation week when foetal sex was disclosed, and access to abortion services. The high sex ratio of most recent births was significantly associated with the use of ultrasound to determine the foetal sex in gestation weeks 12–22 and with access to family planning services that provide abortion. Prenatal sex selection in health facilities are likely to contribute to the recent increase in sex ratio at birth in Vietnam.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: UQ Centre for Clinical Research Publications
Official 2012 Collection
School of Public Health Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 19 Oct 2011, 12:00:11 EST by Wayne Hall on behalf of School of Public Health