Community composition of elasmobranch fishes utilizing intertidal sand flats in Moreton Bay, Queensland, Australia

Pierce, Simon J., Scott-Holland, Tracey B. and Bennett, Michael B. (2011) Community composition of elasmobranch fishes utilizing intertidal sand flats in Moreton Bay, Queensland, Australia. Pacific Science, 65 2: 235-247. doi:10.2984/65.2.235

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Author Pierce, Simon J.
Scott-Holland, Tracey B.
Bennett, Michael B.
Title Community composition of elasmobranch fishes utilizing intertidal sand flats in Moreton Bay, Queensland, Australia
Journal name Pacific Science   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0030-8870
Publication date 2011-04
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.2984/65.2.235
Volume 65
Issue 2
Start page 235
End page 247
Total pages 13
Place of publication United States
Publisher University of Hawaii Press * Journals Department
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Abstract Thirteen elasmobranch species were collected during a 4-yr survey of the intertidal margins of Moreton Bay, a large subtropical embayment in southeastern Queensland, Australia. Stingrays were the most common large predators in the intertidal zone, with total catch dominated numerically by blue-spotted maskray, Neotrygon kuhlii (53.8%); estuary stingray, Dasyatis fluviorum (22.2%); and brown whipray, Himantura toshi (10.2%). There was a significant female bias within intertidal populations of N. kuhlii and D. fluviorum. Courtship behaviors were observed in July and September in D. fluviorum and in January for white-spotted eagle ray, Aetobatus narinari. Dasyatis fluviorum, a threatened Australian endemic stingray, remains locally abundant within the bay. Overall, the inshore elasmobranch fauna of Moreton Bay is relatively species rich compared with similar studies elsewhere in Australia, emphasizing the regional importance of this ecosystem.
Keyword Maskray Neotrygon-Kuhlii
South-east Queensland
Movement patterns
Estuarine
Stingray
Sharks
Ecosystems
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2012 Collection
School of Biomedical Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 18 Oct 2011, 13:42:32 EST by Bacsweet Kaur on behalf of School of Biomedical Sciences