Receivers limit the prevalence of deception in humans: Evidence from diving behaviour in humans

David, Gwendolyn K., Condon, Catriona H., Bywater, Candice L., Ortiz-Barrientos, Daniel and Wilson, Robbie S. (2011) Receivers limit the prevalence of deception in humans: Evidence from diving behaviour in humans. PLoS One, 6 10: e26017-1-e26017-5. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0026017


Author David, Gwendolyn K.
Condon, Catriona H.
Bywater, Candice L.
Ortiz-Barrientos, Daniel
Wilson, Robbie S.
Title Receivers limit the prevalence of deception in humans: Evidence from diving behaviour in humans
Journal name PLoS One   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1932-6203
Publication date 2011-10
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0026017
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 6
Issue 10
Start page e26017-1
End page e26017-5
Total pages 5
Place of publication San Francisco, CA, United States
Publisher Public Library of Science
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Deception remains a hotly debated topic in evolutionary and behavioural research. Our understanding of what impedes or facilitates the use and detection of deceptive signals in humans is still largely limited to studies of verbal deception under laboratory conditions. Recent theoretical models of non-human behaviour have  suggested that the potential outcome for deceivers and the ability of receivers to discriminate signals can effectively maintain their honesty. In this paper, we empirically test these predictions in a real-world case of human deception, simulation in soccer. In support of theoretical predictions in signalling theory, we show that cost-free deceit by soccer players decreases as the potential outcome for the signaller becomes more costly. We further show that the ability of receivers (referees) to detect deceptive signals may limit the prevalence of deception by soccer players. Our study provides empirical support to recent theoretical models in signalling theory, and identifies conditions that may facilitate human deception and hinder its detection.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Article number e26017

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2012 Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 2 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 2 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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Created: Tue, 18 Oct 2011, 13:31:45 EST by Gail Walter on behalf of School of Biological Sciences