Behavioural relevance of polarization sensitivity as a target detection mechanism in cephalopods and fishes

Pignatelli, Vincenzo, Temple, Shelby E., Chiou, Tsyr-Huei, Roberts, Nicholas W., Collin, Shaun P. and Marshall, N. Justin (2011) Behavioural relevance of polarization sensitivity as a target detection mechanism in cephalopods and fishes. Philosophical Transactions of The Royal Society B-Biological Sciences, 366 1565: 734-741. doi:10.1098/rstb.2010.0204


Author Pignatelli, Vincenzo
Temple, Shelby E.
Chiou, Tsyr-Huei
Roberts, Nicholas W.
Collin, Shaun P.
Marshall, N. Justin
Title Behavioural relevance of polarization sensitivity as a target detection mechanism in cephalopods and fishes
Journal name Philosophical Transactions of The Royal Society B-Biological Sciences   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0962-8436
Publication date 2011-03
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1098/rstb.2010.0204
Volume 366
Issue 1565
Start page 734
End page 741
Total pages 8
Place of publication United Kingdom
Publisher The Royal Society Publishing
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Abstract Aquatic habitats are rich in polarized patterns that could provide valuable information about the environment to an animal with a visual system sensitive to polarization of light. Both cephalopods and fishes have been shown to behaviourally respond to polarized light cues, suggesting that polarization sensitivity (PS) may play a role in improving target detection and/or navigation/orientation. However, while there is general agreement concerning the presence of PS in cephalopods and some fish species, its functional significance remains uncertain. Testing the role of PS in predator or prey detection seems an excellent paradigm with which to study the contribution of PS to the sensory assets of both groups, because such behaviours are critical to survival. We developed a novel experimental set-up to deliver computer-generated, controllable, polarized stimuli to freeswimming cephalopods and fishes with which we tested the behavioural relevance of PS using stimuli that evoke innate responses (such as an escape response from a looming stimulus and a pursuing behaviour of a small prey-like stimulus). We report consistent responses of cephalopods to looming stimuli presented in polarization and luminance contrast; however, none of the fishes tested responded to either the looming or the prey-like stimuli when presented in polarization contrast
Keyword Startle response
LCD
Goldfish
Zebrafish
Squid
Cuttlefish
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Queensland Brain Institute Publications
Official 2012 Collection
School of Biomedical Sciences Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 11 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 8 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 57 Abstract Views  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Mon, 17 Oct 2011, 18:30:02 EST by Shelby Temple on behalf of School of Biomedical Sciences