The rise of the baggy green as an Australian symbol: The modern invention of an age-old tradition

Croke, Christopher and Harper, Melissa (2011) The rise of the baggy green as an Australian symbol: The modern invention of an age-old tradition. Sport in Society, 14 5: 685-700. doi:10.1080/17430437.2011.575113

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Author Croke, Christopher
Harper, Melissa
Title The rise of the baggy green as an Australian symbol: The modern invention of an age-old tradition
Journal name Sport in Society   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1743-0437
1743-0445
Publication date 2011-06-05
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/17430437.2011.575113
Open Access Status
Volume 14
Issue 5
Start page 685
End page 700
Total pages 16
Place of publication Abingdon, Oxon, United Kingdom
Publisher Routledge
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Abstract A baggy green cap has been a part of the Australian test cricket uniform since the early twentieth century. However, it is only from the 1990s that the cap has become an important national symbol, invested with the task of embodying national characteristics and values. This article examines how and why the baggy green cap assumed its symbolic status. We argue that rather than an organic development, the ‘cult of the baggy green’ is what Eric Hobsbawm would call an ‘invented tradition’. The cap's ability to signify Australianness is the product of self-conscious rituals, canny marketing and discursive veneration.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2012 Collection
School of Communication and Arts Publications
 
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Created: Mon, 17 Oct 2011, 14:26:00 EST by Dr Melissa Harper on behalf of School of Communication and Arts